« Belmont home

Substance-Free Campus Policy



Belmont University is committed to self-control and the respect for self and others that enables all individuals to develop intellectually, spiritually, socially, emotionally and physically. Therefore, the university is committed to an environment free of alcohol, illegal drugs, legal proximates of illegal drug, and misuse of legal drugs.

It is a violation of Belmont’s Community Commitments and its Substance-Free Campus Policy to consume, possess, or be intoxicated by alcohol or drugs or to be in the presence of alcohol or drugs regardless of your own use, possession, or intoxication on campus. Further, it is a violation to have paraphernalia on campus (such as empty bottles, posters, shot glasses, etc.) that supports, promotes, or facilitates usage of alcohol or drugs. Finally, distribution of alcohol or drugs on campus is a violation meriting an escalated disciplinary response. Violations may result in the imposition of one or more of the sanctions described in the Bruin Guide.
To facilitate student understanding of specific behaviors that violate the Substance-Free Campus Policy, the following definitions are provided:

  • Consumption, which is considered use of alcohol or drugs. Student need not be in the act of consuming; rather, information indicative of recent consumption constitutes a violation.
    Intoxication, which is considered a student being in an altered state of mind at the time of the incident. Students found responsible for intoxication are also responsible for consumption. Due to the danger to the student and our community, intoxication escalates the university’s response.
  • Possession, which is considered actual presence of alcohol or drugs. When no alcohol or drugs are actually present, information may suggest the student is responsible for consumption and/or paraphernalia, but not possession.
    Paraphernalia, which ranges from items that support or promote alcohol or drugs (like posters, clothing, etc.) to items that contained or are employed in the use of alcohol or other drugs.
  • Paraphernalia indicative of consumption may receive a response similar to consumption.
  • Complicity, which is considered a student being in the presence of alcohol or drugs and does not require actual consumption, intoxication, possession or paraphernalia by or belonging to that student.
  • Distribution, which is the provision of alcohol, illegal drugs, legal proximates of illegal drugs, or legal drugs proscribed to the distributor to others, whether or not for profit. Due to the danger and/or disruption to our community, distribution escalates the university’s response.
University Response to Violations

Belmont takes its responsibility to facilitate the positive development of students seriously. Consequently, it reserves the right to impose disciplinary sanctions for violations of the Substance-Free Campus Policy. The severity of the applicable sanction depends upon a number of factors including, but not limited to, the student's past history of disciplinary infraction, the amount or nature of alcohol or drugs involved, and the cooperativeness of the student during the investigation and disciplinary process. Any student found responsible for a violation may be subject to disciplinary sanctions that are listed in the Bruin Guide, including required participation in a drug or alcohol treatment or rehabilitation program, institutional probation, suspension, expulsion and/or referral of the matter for criminal prosecution. Often these sanctions are used in conjunction. Additional disciplinary sanctions may also be imposed at the discretion of appropriate university personnel.

Accordingly, for students who choose to consume or possess drugs or to possess paraphernalia indicative of drug consumption or possession the university’s disciplinary response will likely include separation from the institution, via suspension or expulsion. This separation typically involves the loss of tuition, fees, coursework, and other privileges of an enrolled student. The university’s disciplinary sanctions can vary for alcohol. However, students who provide alcohol to others, endanger persons or property, who have multiple violations or have other violations that demonstrate a disregard for the Substance-Free Campus Policy may be placed on probation and/or separated from the institution in addition to other sanctions.

Finally, students should note that if the university’s intervention or search of a student, a student's possessions, or a student's on-campus residence discovers drugs and/or alcohol, the items may be turned over to local law enforcement. At that time, local law enforcement may choose to pursue criminal charges, which are separate from Belmont’s adjudication process for alleged violations. Underage possession of alcohol is a Class A Misdemeanor and, as such, may be reported to law enforcement authorities.

Alcohol and Controlled Substances Notification Policy

The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act permit educational institutions to disclose to the parents or legal guardians of a student, information regarding the student's violation of any federal, state or local law or any rule or policy of the institution regarding the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance, if the student is under age 21 and the institution determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to such use or possession.

The purpose of Belmont University's Alcohol & Controlled Substances Notification Policy is to foster broader engagement of the influences that shape students' attitudes and choices regarding the use of alcohol and other controlled substances. While the university holds each student personally accountable for his or her conduct while enrolled, and addresses violations directly with him or her, it recognizes and seeks to support the pivotal role parents and guardians play in students' success by notifying them of incidents involving the use of alcohol or other controlled substances.

Parents or guardians of students under 21 years of age may be notified under any of the following circumstances:

  • The student has been found responsible for violation of a federal, state or local law related to alcohol or controlled substances
  • The student has been found responsible for violation of a university policy related to alcohol or other drugs at least one time previous to the current violation
  • The student is required to be transported to a medical facility and treated because of alcohol or other drug use
  • The student has caused harm to him/herself or others while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs
  • The student was responsible for vandalism or other destruction of property while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs
  • The information regarding the student is needed in connection with an emergency to protect the health or safety of the student or other individual
  • Other appropriate circumstances as determined by the Dean of Students or designee.

Note, these guidelines do not preclude the university's contacting parents or guardians for other policy violations that may endanger the health and well-being of a student or other individuals in the community.

Health and/or Development Risks Associated with Alcohol and Drug Use

Belmont is substance-free because academic research and professional experience demonstrate the decision to abuse alcohol or use drugs has profoundly negative effects on a student’s collegiate career. Harvard’s School of Public Health found binge drinking of alcohol negatively impacts academic performance, social relationships, risk taking behaviors, and health of college students. Similarly, numerous studies have associated drug use with dependence, lower grades, an increased likelihood of dropping out, missed classes, high-risk sexual activity, difficulty finding purpose and anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that interfere with learning and personal development. The following provides further details about the health risks of specific drugs as well as alcohol.

Narcotics such as opium, morphine and heroin can cause euphoria, drowsiness, respirator depression, constricted pupils and nausea. The symptoms of an overdose of narcotics are slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma and possible death. Persons experiencing withdrawal from addiction to narcotics can experience watery eyes, runny nose, yawning, loss of appetite, irritability, tremors, panic, cramps, nausea, chills and sweating.

Depressants such as barbiturates and Quaaludes can cause slurred speech, disorientation and drunken behavior. An overdose of a depressant may result in shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma and possible death. Withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, insomnia, tremors, delirium, convulsions and possible death.

Stimulants such as cocaine and crack can cause increased alertness or euphoria, and increased pulse rate and blood pressure, insomnia and loss of appetite. An overdose of stimulants results in agitation, an increase in body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions and possible death. Withdrawal symptoms include apathy, long periods of sleep, irritability, depression and disorientation. Hallucinogens such as LSD and amphetamines cause delusions and hallucinations, and poor perceptions of time and distance. The effects of an overdose include psychosis and possible death.

Marijuana and hashish can cause euphoria, increased appetite, relaxed inhibitions and disoriented behavior. The effects of an overdose include fatigue, paranoia and possible psychosis. Withdrawal symptoms include insomnia, hyperactivity and decreased appetite.

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, include spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person's ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory distress and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and liver.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than their peers of becoming alcoholics.

Responsible Friend Clause to the Substance Free Campus Policy

This part of the Substance Free Campus policy provides for special consideration in cases where the likelihood of judicial action may create a disincentive for Belmont students to seek necessary medical assistance for intoxication. The health and safety of Belmont students is of paramount importance therefore we believe is in the best interest of this community when individuals report crimes, contact 911 or seek assistance through campus resources so that we can reduce barriers to seeking assistance for Belmont students who may be concerned about judicial consequences for themselves or the person in need. To this end, Belmont University retains the right to waive standard judicial processes for Belmont students seeking medical assistance for themselves or others due to imminent risk associated with intoxication.

If an individual seeks medical attention due to his/her level of intoxication, the University may not choose to pursue punitive sanctions against the Belmont student for violations of the Substance Free Campus Policy. Additionally, Belmont student(s) directly assisting an intoxicated Belmont student in obtaining medical attention in such a situation may also be exempt from punitive action. (Note: a student calling for medical assistance on behalf of an intoxicated individual must stay present with this student until official help from a staff member in Student Affairs or Campus Security has arrived in order to receive this consideration.)

In lieu of standard judicial processes, Belmont students receiving consideration under the Responsible Friend Clause will be required to meet with the Director for Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, who may issue educational requirements such as alcohol education and/or assessment. Egregious or repeated incidents will prompt an escalated response. The student will be responsible for any costs directly associated with educational interventions. In most cases, consistent with the university’s general policies regarding alcohol and substance abuse, the student’s parents or legal guardians will be informed of the incident by letter.

This policy does not preclude disciplinary sanctions due to any other violations of the Code of Conduct, and has no bearing on the actions by police or other law enforcement personnel.

Alcohol and Drug Treatment Information

Following is a list of resources of treatment options. Belmont University does not have a contractual relationship with any of the resources listed below. They are simply listed as a courtesy to students. Students should determine for themselves whether they feel the agency will meet their needs.

  • Alcoholics Anonymous 615-831-1050
  • Narcotics Anonymous 1-800-677-1462
  • Center for Alcohol & Drug Treatment 1-800-284-2216
  • Cumberland Heights Alcohol & Drug Treatment Center 615-356-2700
  • Tennessee Christian Medical Center 615-865-0300
  • Vanderbilt Addiction Center 615-936-3555
Criminal Sanctions

The Metropolitan Government of Nashville/Davidson County prohibits the following acts and prescribes the corresponding penalties:

  • It is unlawful to possess a hypodermic needle, syringe or other item used with an illicit drug or controlled substance that has traces of a controlled substance upon it.
  • It is illegal to sell or give certain types of glue or plastic cement to anyone under 21 years of age. Being under the influence of one of these substances in public is also prohibited.
  • It is unlawful for any person under the age of 19: a) to be present in an automobile on any public street when alcoholic beverages are being consumed in the automobile and b) to be present in any public park and be a companion of or otherwise associated with any person who is consuming alcoholic beverages who is not his or her parent or guardian or who has not secured written consent from the parent or guardian for the child to be present.
  • It shall be a violation for any person, while on a public street or in a place generally open to the public (and not licensed for the on-premises consumption of alcoholic beverages) to have in their possession any alcoholic beverage for the purpose of consumption in a container unless the container be commercially sealed.

Each of these offenses is punishable by a fine up to $500.

The State of Tennessee prohibits the following acts and prescribes the corresponding penalties:

  • Persuading, enticing, or sending a person under 21 years of age to purchase alcoholic beverages or buying an alcoholic beverage for one under the age of 21 is punishable by up to 200 hours of community service and revocation of driving privileges.
  • It is illegal to be intoxicated in public. Such behavior can result in up to 30 days in jail and/or a $50 fine.
  • Consuming or possessing alcohol on the premises of an elementary, junior high or high school is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and/or a $50 fine.
  • Driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage or drug is punishable by a jail term of up to 7 days, up to a $1500 fine and loss of driving privileges for one year for the first offence: a jail term of 11 months and 29 days, up to a $3,500 fine and loss of driving privileges for two year for the second offense; and a jail term of 11 months 29 days, up to a $10,000 fine and the loss of driving privileges for up to 10 years for the third offense. In addition, a court may order inpatient treatment at a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center.
  • Killing another person while driving a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs can result in up to a 30 year sentence, a fine of up to $10,000 and the loss of one’s license for up to 10 years.
  • Being intoxicated and, as a result of intoxication, recklessly causing serious bodily injury to another while operating a motor vehicle is punishable by two to 12 years in prison, the loss of driving privileges for one year per offence with a maximum loss of 5 years and a fine up to $5,000.
  • Consuming or possessing in an open container any alcoholic beverage or beer while operating a motor vehicle may result a fine up to $50.
  • It is illegal to possess with the intent to manufacture, deliver or sell an illicit drug or controlled substance. Depending on the type of substance and its quantity, such fines will be at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, is subject to a jail term of up to 11 months and 29 days and a $2,500 fine.
  • If two or more prior convictions are present, the possible sentence increases to six years in prison and a $3,000 fine. In addition, a court may order enrollment in a drug offender school and/or community service at a drug treatment facility.
  • The casual exchange of even small amounts of an illicit drug or controlled substance with a minor can result in a penalty of up to life in prison and a $500,000 fine.
  • Inhaling, selling, giving or possessing glue, paint, gas aerosol or gas for an unlawful purpose is punishable by a jail term of 11 months and 29 days to six years and a fine of up to $3,000.
  • It is illegal to sell or buy any item that is represented to be an illicit drug or controlled substance. Such an act is punishable by up to six years in prison and a $3,000 fine.
  • It is illegal to sell, deliver or possess the seeds of jimsonweed on the premises of any elementary, junior high or high school. The penalty for such an act is 11 months and 29 days in jail and/or a fine up to $2,500.
  • It is unlawful to possess with the intent to manufacture or deliver an anabolic steroid. This act is punishable by two to 12 years in prison and a fine of up to $50,000.

The Federal Government of the United States prohibits the following drug trafficking acts and prescribes the corresponding penalties:  

DRUG/SCHEDULE

 

QUANTITY

 

PENALTIES

 

QUANTITY

 

PENALTIES

 

Cocaine (Schedule II) 500-4999 gms mixture

First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual
5 kgs or more mixture First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual. Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if not an individual. 2 or More Prior Offenses: Life Imprisonment

Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

5-49 gms mixture

50 gms or more mixture

Fentanyl (Schedule II)

40-399 gms mixture

400 gms or more mixture

Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)

10-99 gms mixture

100 gms or more mixture

Heroin (Schedule I)

100-999 gms mixture

1 kg or more mixture

LSD (Schedule I)

1-9 gms mixture

10 gms or more mixture

Methamphetamine (Schedule II)

5-49 gms pure or 50-499 gms mixture

50 gms or more pure or 500 gms or more mixture

PCP (Schedule II)

10-99 gms pure or 100-999 gms mixture

100 gm or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture

DRUG/SCHEDULE

 

QUANTITY

 

PENALTIES

 

Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid) Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

1 gm or more

Other Schedule III drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

30 to 999 mgs

All Other Schedule IV drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 6 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual.

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

Less than 30 mgs

All Schedule V drugs

Any amount First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual. Second Offense: Not more than 2 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

 

DRUG/SCHEDULE

 

 

QUANTITY

 

PENALTIES

Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid) Any Amount

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) 1 gm or more
Other Schedule III drugs Any Amount

First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if not an individual

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) 30 to 999 mgs

 

DRUG/SCHEDULE

 

QUANTITY

 

1st OFFENSE

 

2nd OFFENSE

 

Marijuana 1,000 kg or more mixture; or 1,000 or more plants *Not less than 10 years, not more than life *If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life *Fine not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual *Not less than 20 years, not more than life. *If death or serious injury, mandatory life *Fine not more than $8 million if an individual, $20 million if other than an individual
Marijuana 100 kg to 999 kg mixture; or 100 to 999 plants *Not less than 5 years, not more than 40 years *If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life *Fine not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual *Not less than 10 years, not more than life *If death or serious injury, mandatory life *Fine not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual
Marijuana More than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg mixture More than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 plants *Not more than 20 years *If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life *Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual *Not more than 30 years *If death or serious injury, mandatory life *Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than individual
Marijuana 1 to 49 plants; less than 50 kg mixture *Not more than 5 years *Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if other than individual *Not more than 10 years *Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual
Hashish 10 kg or less
Hashish Oil 1 kg or less


connect