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Course Descriptions

Spring and Summer 2019
Spring

CHN 3020    Advanced Chinese                                                                                        Li

Chinese 3020 is the third year and the 6th semester of the sequential Chinese language study, which represents an advanced stage of Chinese language acquisition.  Advanced Chinese will continue focusing on the development and integration of students’ four language skills.  In addition to the further learning of extensive grammar, this course will also aim to enlarge students’ vocabulary immensely, enhance students’ reading and writing abilities, and improve their spoken proficiency in communicating thoughts fluently regarding a wide range of topics. It will continue to develop students’ appreciation for and knowledge of Chinese culture.

FRE 2100 Intermediate Studies                                                                                  Brown

French 2100 is an intermediate-level French course designed to provide a bridge to more advanced courses.  This course places strong emphasis on reading skill development through constant reinforcement of reading strategies.  Reading will be, therefore, placed alongside speaking and listening as an active language skill.  The skills of listening, speaking, and writing will continue to be reinforced.  Class discussions will concentrate on the readings.  Practice will also be provided in writing and revision, through frequent writing assignments.  Various aspects of the cultures of the francophone world will be discussed as frames to better understand the writers and the writing studied.  Because your developing ability to use the French that you know is important, your active participation in class discussion is strongly encouraged.  This class will be conducted entirely in French.  French 2100 is enthusiastically recommended to students who intend to take 3000-level French courses.

FRE 3010  Introduction to French Literature and Civilization I                                  Brown

French 3010 is an overview of French literary history from the Middle Ages through French Classicism focusing on prominent writers and their work.  It is designed to help students to grasp the basic structural relationships of a literary text in order to read more critically and imaginatively.  It is designed to prepare students for more advanced study in literature.  French 3010 is also an overview of French civilization focusing on important events, movements, and persons in the political and artistic history of France.  In this course, students will continue to build on their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.  Speaking skills focused upon include detailed narration and description and communication of reactions to and analysis of the assigned reading selections.  Listening skills will be challenged as the students are exposed to short lectures in French on a variety of topics.  Students will read texts closely, focusing on the structure and stylistics of the selection but also on the vocabulary and grammatical structures used.  Finally, students will be given practice in note-taking and will be asked to write short résumés, compositions, and written responses to comprehension questions relating to the reading selections.

FRE 3600/HUM 3100 French Literature in Film                                                               Brown

In this course, students will read several works of French literature and watch film adaptations of those works.  In addition to a midterm and final, students will write several film reflections.  Since this is a cross-listed course, the course will be taught in English.  The films will be in French with English subtitles.  HUM students will read the literary works in translation.  FRE students' reading will be in the original French and they will write their film reflections in French.  Additionally, FRE students are required to stay an extra hour each week to discuss course material in French.  

GER 3500.01G 1949-1989 Representations of a Divided Country: Germany East and West                                                                                                                                    Schwarzmeier

This course is an exploration of Germany’s history from 1949-1989, from the partition of the country to its reunification, and its representation in literature, film and art. It will introduce students to the political, ideological, economic, social and cultural developments in Germany East and West and investigate the construction of national identities based on writings by major East and West German intellectuals and creative writers. The variety of topics promises to be stimulating for discussions, and since the class will be conducted in German it will further aid students in improving their language skills.
Through the close study of authentic texts from a variety of genres such as journalism, short story, song lyrics as well as films we will analyze and discuss aspects of German culture and civilization with focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. It will also offer continued practice in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing.


GER 3600.01G Women in German Culture                                                  Schwarzmeier
     

This course will introduce the students to the cultural achievements of German-speaking women from the Middle Ages to the present. For a better understanding and deeper appreciation of women’s contributions to German culture, it is necessary to know about the conditions in which women wrote, painted, composed, …. and the conditions in which their creations were received. Therefore, we will not only study works by women but also explore and explain the interaction of cultural, social, political and economic factors that affected women and their works at different times. Our focus will be the (changing?) role of women in culture and society. We will examine and question the role and situation of women in a patriarchal society, investigate their possibilities and limitations, look at their role behavior, their relationship with men and their interaction with each other as well as their self-understanding.

This class will be conducted in German and will further aid students in improving their language skills.

ITL 3370/HUM 2000 (crosslisted) Female Characters in Italian Cinema           Muccini                   

In this course we will focus on the presence of women as protagonists, symbolic figures, and filmmakers in Italian cinema. We will study how the image of women has changed in Italian Cinema from the mid 1940’s to our days with particular attention to the appeal of female stars of Italian motion pictures produced in the post-war period. Readings will be in English and films will be viewed with English subtitles for the course taught in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary. Students who are taking the class for Italian credits will read the material and do the assignments in Italian. 

Learning outcomes:
1.To understand the context out of  which films emerged.
2.To acquire a broad overview of Italian culture.
3. To learn how to analyze films as representations of political, social, and economic history and to consider unavoidable biases that affect such representations.
4. To explore the historical roles of Italian women and the changing position of present day women.

SPA 3110: Advanced Spanish II                                                                                 Boero
SPANISH 3110 is the second in a series of two advanced level courses offered at Belmont for students who have just completed our intermediate sequence (SPA 2010 & 2020).  The primary focus of both SPA 3100 and SPA 3110 is to develop the students’ proficiency (in writing, reading, listening, and speaking) through a series of thematic units that are structured by authentic texts from a variety of genres (poetry, journalism, short story, essay, song lyrics, comic strips, films, etc.).  Each unit is made up of three chapters that introduce new vocabulary and idiomatic expressions, and that include an in depth review of the grammatical paradigms students need to master in order to perform at the advanced to superior level of proficiency. 

In the spring of 2019, students enrolled in Professor Boero’s sections of SPA 3110 will read, think about, and communicate their ideas on a variety of topics affecting Hispanics all over the world: national identity as ideological construction, oppressive governments, demands for social justice, exile, and the immigrant experience. 

In order to have access to how Hispanics living abroad feel about many of the topics we will discuss in class,  students will participate in five TalkAbroad conversations (via SKYPE) with native speakers of Spanish living throughout Spanish America. Moreover, these five conversations will be carefully designed to give each student the opportunity to develop his/her interpersonal and presentational communication skills by performing within a specific range of difficulty. All conversations will include speaking tasks ranging in difficulty from the intermediate to the advanced-high / superior levels of speaking proficiency.        

All students enrolling in SPA 3110 should have successfully completed SPA 3100 at Belmont University or its equivalent at another institution.  If this is not the case for you, please contact Prof. Boero at paulo.boero@belmont.edu (exceptions may be made).

SPA 3500.01G  Advanced Hispanic Literature and Culture
                                         McCoy
 This is a survey course that introduces students to canonical literary and cultural production from many of the countries where Spanish is the primary language.  In addition to understanding various literary genres, this course will also include forays into film, fine, and performing art.  Students will learn to close read Hispanic literature (how reading and re reading yield deeper understandings), to watch and evaluate Hispanic film critically, to understand periodization and fine art production, and to read and perform at least one theatrical work. PREREQUISITES:  Students should have completed Advanced Spanish I and II (SPA 3100 & 3110) or visit Dr. McCoy for permission to take this course. It will be facilitated in Spanish.

SPA 3500 Spanish Transatlantic Studies                                                                   Pelaz

This course will provide an introduction to the concept of “transatlantic” relations as both a literary-historical phenomenon and a field of study, with the aim of addressing the central questions of how the Atlantic mediated the literatures, politics, and trade relations of the “Atlantic world” from roughly 1500-present time, as well as how the idea of transatlanticism changes the way we read and understand “national” literatures affected by transatlantic relations. This interactive, discussion-based course will cover a range of literatures, pop cultures, correspondences, and historical accounts related to the Americas, Africa, the Caribbean, and Spain.    Taught in Spanish.

 Humanities Courses

HUM 3015 Junior Cornerstone Italian Culture through Films                      Muccini
Spring  1 2019
We will study major Italian films in order to gain an overview of the dramatic economic, social and political changes in Italian society from the beginning of the 20th century through today. We will watch movies that examine the political, economic, social and psychological problems Italy faced during Fascism and in the aftermath of World War II.  Next we will examine films that portray Italy during the years of the economic miracle (1957-1962) to show both prosperity in some classes and regions of Italian society and continuing economic and social problems in others. We will also examine the social tensions, violence, corruption, mafia terror, and lack of confidence in the institutions and national identity which still plague the country. The course is conducted in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary. The course will include a class project and presentation.
Learning outcomes
1. To learn how to analyze films as representations of political, social, and economic history and to consider unavoidable biases that affect such representations.
2. To research and analyze through movies Italy’s political, economic, social, and cultural history.
3. To acquire a broad overview of Italy’s post-War reconstruction, providing an acquaintance with the issues affecting ordinary Italians through critical consideration of the ideas, the contexts, and the practices of filmmakers and film commentators in this period.
4.To study characters, plots, and themes of Italian films in relation to the changes in Italian society.
5.To appreciate and enjoy Italian films in a wide variety of genres (neorealism, auteur films, commedia all’italiana).

HUM 2000/ITL 3370 (crosslisted) Female Characters in Italian Cinema           Muccini      
Spring 1 2019          

In this course we will focus on the presence of women as protagonists, symbolic figures, and filmmakers in Italian cinema. We will study how the image of women has changed in Italian Cinema from the mid 1940’s to our days with particular attention to the appeal of female stars of Italian motion pictures produced in the post-war period. Readings will be in English and films will be viewed with English subtitles for the course taught in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary. Students who are taking the class for Italian credits will read the material and do the assignments in Italian. 

Learning outcomes:
1. To understand the context out of  which films emerged.
2. To acquire a broad overview of Italian culture.
3. To learn how to analyze films as representations of political, social, and economic history and to consider unavoidable biases that affect such representations.
4. To explore the historical roles of Italian women and the changing position of present day women.

ITL3370/HUM 2000 (crosslisted) Made in Italy: Food, Fashion, and the Arts      Muccini
Summer 2019

Italian fashion, food, and the arts are icons of culture and style, both in Italy itself and worldwide. This course will explore how have shaped perceptions of Italians around the world. The course will also deal with the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of contemporary Italy and at the same time will draw links between past and present, evidencing the importance of tradition and history in Italian society. As we study various cultural phenomena, including the Italian Renaissance and its art, we will be interested in reflecting on how Italian art, literature and philosophy have transcended the strict confines of their political and historical origin to become a source of universal inspiration.  In studying Italian music and theater, and cuisine, and fashion, we will attempt to identify distinctly Italian aspects as we also study common behaviors which are also recognizable in other cultural contexts.   

The course is conducted in English. For students of Italian there will be an additional weekly meeting and the written assignments will be in Italian.

Learning outcomes:

  1. Student will learn to understand the historical dimensions of Italian cultural phenomena and the importance of Italian culture history in determining contemporary Italian culture.

  2. Students will understand that Italy can be studied as both a unified culture and also as a collection of regions with differing traditions and cultural perspectives.

  3. Students will enhance their reading skill at analyzing complex literary texts

  4. Students will develop their skills at analyzing visual phenomena (works of art, design, etc.) in relation to Italian culture.

  5. Students will learn to study that the differences between the Italian culture and American culture.

HUM 3100/ FRE 3600 French Literature in Film                                                    Brown
In this course, students will read several works of French literature and watch film adaptations of those works.  In addition to a midterm and final, students will write several film reflections.  Since this is a cross-listed course, the course will be taught in English.  The films will be in French with English subtitles.  HUM students will read the literary works in translation.  FRE students' reading will be in the original French and they will write their film reflections in French.  Additionally, FRE students are required to stay an extra hour each week to discuss course material in French.  

Summer

HUM 2895.01G/GER 3600.01G  German History through Film                        Schwarzmeier
Summer 1
This course is designed to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to Germany in the 20th and 21st century, its history and culture. The films we will watch will be in German with English subtitles. Each film will depict a specific aspect of German history and cover a broad spectrum, from Germany’s Nazi-Past, the Holocaust and resistance against Hitler to life and its challenges in the divided and later reunited Germany. To enrich the experience, students will also have to read some texts about German history and culture.

The course will be taught in English. Students who would like to take it for German credit will have to meet with the instructor for an additional class meeting of 75 minutes per week which will be conducted in German to further improve their language skills.

HUM 2000/ITL3370 (crosslisted) Made in Italy: Food, Fashion, and the Arts     Muccini
Summer 1
Italian fashion, food, and the arts are icons of culture and style, both in Italy itself and worldwide. This course will explore how have shaped perceptions of Italians around the world. The course will also deal with the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of contemporary Italy and at the same time will draw links between past and present, evidencing the importance of tradition and history in Italian society. As we study various cultural phenomena, including the Italian Renaissance and its art, we will be interested in reflecting on how Italian art, literature and philosophy have transcended the strict confines of their political and historical origin to become a source of universal inspiration.  In studying Italian music and theater, and cuisine, and fashion, we will attempt to identify distinctly Italian aspects as we also study common behaviors which are also recognizable in other cultural contexts. 

The course is conducted in English. For students of Italian there will be an additional weekly meeting and the written assignments will be in Italian.

Learning outcomes:

  1. Student will learn to understand the historical dimensions of Italian cultural phenomena and the importance of Italian culture history in determining contemporary Italian culture.

  2. Students will understand that Italy can be studied as both a unified culture and also as a collection of regions with differing traditions and cultural perspectives.

  3. Students will enhance their reading skill at analyzing complex literary texts

  4. Students will develop their skills at analyzing visual phenomena (works of art, design, etc.) in relation to Italian culture.

  5. Students will learn to study that the differences between the Italian culture and American culture.

 

SPANISH Classes on Belmont Campus

Summer Session 1                                           SPA 1010 (4 credit hrs.)  12 – 2:10 p.m.                    Prof. Boero

(June 3 – July 5, 2019)                                      SPA 2010 (3 credit hrs.)   9:30 -11:15 a.m.               Prof. Boero


Summer Session 2 / July:                                SPA 1020
(4 credit hrs.)     12 -2:10 p.m.                   Prof. Julseth

(July 8 – August 6, 2019)                                   SPA 2020 (3 credit hrs.)    9:30 -11:15 a.m.              Prof. Julseth

The summer can be a wonderful time to learn Spanish on the Belmont University campus. Classes tend to have fewer students, they meet every day of the week, and they progress at a steady and intense pace, all of which makes it easier for many students to excel in them. If you are interested in taking any of these Spanish classes on campus this summer and have any questions about what to expect, reach out to Professor Boero (paulo.boero@belmont.edu) or Professor Julseth (david.julseth@belmont.edu).

REGISTRATION for on-campus, summer 2019 Spanish classes is open now until June and July.