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Belmont University | Belief in Something Greater

Course Descriptions

SPRING AND SUMMER 2020
Spring Courses

CHN 3020 Advanced Chinese                                                                                                       Li

Chinese 3020 is the third year and the 6th semester of the sequential Chinese language study, which represents an advanced stage of Chinese language acquisition.  Advanced Chinese will continue focusing on the development and integration of students’ four language skills.  In addition to the further learning of extensive grammar, this course will also aim to enlarge students’ vocabulary immensely, enhance students’ reading and writing abilities, and improve their spoken proficiency in communicating thoughts fluently regarding a wide range of topics. It will continue to develop students’ appreciation for and knowledge of Chinese culture.

FRE 2100 Intermediate Studies                                                                                                Brown
French 2100 is an intermediate-level French course designed to provide a bridge to more advanced courses.  This course places strong emphasis on reading skill development through constant reinforcement of reading strategies.  Reading will be, therefore, placed alongside speaking and listening as an active language skill.  The skills of listening, speaking, and writing will continue to be reinforced.  Class discussions will concentrate on the readings.  Practice will also be provided in writing and revision, through frequent writing assignments.  Various aspects of the cultures of the francophone world will be discussed as frames to better understand the writers and the writing studied.  Because your developing ability to use the French that you know is important, your active participation in class discussion is strongly encouraged.  This class will be conducted entirely in French.  French 2100 is enthusiastically recommended to students who intend to take 3000-level French courses.

FRE 3600  French Phonetics                                                                                                       Brown

This course is designed to teach the French sound system primarily through the principle of contrastive analysis of French and English.  This principle will be applied to explanations of French articulation, explanations of typical pronunciation errors caused by English interferences, as well as to auditory discrimination exercises.  The student, therefore, becomes aware of how he or she pronounces English, how French differs from English, and what elements cause pronunciation problems.  The audio program that accompanies the textbook will be used extensively for active practice of French pronunciation and for auditory discrimination exercises.  Finally, the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) will be taught and practiced extensively through phonetic transcription of texts.  Knowledge of the IPA will allow the student to use the dictionary as a pronunciation resource. 

FRE 3600/HUM 3100/ French History, Literature, and Culture through Film                                   Brown  

This course will make use of readings and film as windows to the study of French history, literature, and culture. The two required texts focus on French history and modern French culture.  Additional readings will include information on particular films, articles dealing with French culture and social issues, and excerpts from French works of literature.  The readings and the films chosen for this course will be organized into various thematic units: film adaptations of French literature; historical events depicted in film; social issues explored by film, particularly issues of integration; war and its effects.  Since this is a cross-listed course, the course will be taught in English and the readings are in English.  The films will be shown in French with English subtitles.  Film reflection papers of 1-2 pages will be required of all students.  All students will take exams on the readings assigned.  Students taking the course for FRE credit will be required to write all of their course work in French and will be required to meet an additional hour per week with the instructor to discuss the course work in French.  

GER 3020  German Studies II                                                                                                    Schwarzmeier

This class is designed as a survey course in German history, literature, and culture. It combines practice in oral and written expression with the close study of selected writings in the original. The period covered in this course is from 1848 to 1914. The time from 1750 to 1848 is covered in GER 3010 German Studies I. However, GER 3010 is not a prerequisite for GER 3020.

This course will be taught in German and combine practice in oral and written expression with the close study of selected readings in the original.

GER 3600    German Film                                                                                                       Schwarzmeier

This class is designed as a survey course in German film history from the Weimar era to the present, with emphasis on contemporary German film. We will watch and study films such as M, Der blaue Engel, Berlin – Ecke Schönhauser, Das Versprechen, Good bye, Lenin!, Nirgendwo in Afrika, Sophie Scholl, Lola rennt, Das Leben der Anderen, Das weiße Band, Die Fremde, Aus dem Nichts, Aguirre: Der Zorn Gottes. The variety of styles and topics (for example Nazi-Past, terrorism, gender roles, magic realism) promises to be stimulating for discussions and will deepen the students’ knowledge of German culture. Since the class will be conducted in German, it will further aid students in improving their language skills.


ITL3010/HUM 2000 Italian Food, Fashion, and Film     (Crosslisted)                                              Muccini
Spring second 8 weeks            

Italian fashion, films, and food are icons of culture and style, both in Italy itself and worldwide. This course will explore how these “3 Fs” have shaped perceptions of Italians around the world. The course will also deal with the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of contemporary Italy and at the same time will draw links between past (Renaissance, Futurism) and present, evidencing the importance of tradition and history in Italian society. In the context of that overview, we will study the key elements of Italian cultural identity: traditional elements such as cinema and cuisine, as well as contemporary cultural phenomena such as fashion, the culture of the coffee shop and of moto-scooters in a crowded urban setting. In addition to introducing students to one of the richest literary and cultural traditions in Europe, this course also serves an intellectual foundation for students who are thinking about studying abroad in Italy. The course is conducted in English. Students who want to take this class for Italian credit need to contact the instructor.

SPAN 3600/HUM 2895: Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in Latin America                                        Esquival-King

This course explores issues of gender, race, and ethnicity, particularly focusing on culture and the Jewish and Afro diaspora within Latin America. This course will focus on the “problems” of race versus ethnicity. It explores the historical construction of gender and race in modern Latin America and their connections with the processes of class and national formation in the region. Race, ethnicity, and gender are powerful coordinates in the network of domination, for both the oppressors and the victims’. Some of the questions of this course are: How did Latin Americans construct and interpret racial, ethnic and gender identities and ideologies? And how these interpretations and ideologies have been used to formulate an idea of nation? This course talks about the different ways ethnicity and race have been defined in the Latin America studies (historiography) and the ideologies and practices associated with these categories.

SPA 3110 Advanced Spanish II                                                                                            McCoy
This course, which is required for the major, is designed to help the learner develop increased accuracy and sophistication in writing in Spanish for academic purposes and continued oral practice at the advanced level in Spanish. It is the second course in the 3100/3110 sequence and its goals are as follows:

  1.  Write effectively at the ACTFL Advanced level, presenting information, concepts and ideas on a variety of topics, using the four major modes of writing:  description, narration, exposition (analysis, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect), argumentation. (Standards  1.3;  2;  3;  4.2)

    2.  Take notes in Spanish from written texts and from oral sources for use in formulating and expressing their own ideas. (Standards  1.2,  2;  3)

    3.  Use Microsoft Word in Spanish to produce essays and other written material.

    4.  Edit successfully their own written work, recognizing deficiencies in clarity, organization, support, grammar and mechanics. (Standards  1.3,  4.1)

    5.  Use complex structures of Spanish grammar in contextualized exercises with consistency; use these structures in composition with some inconsistencies and inaccuracies. Produce writing that is generally comprehensible to native readers. (Standards 1.3;  4.1)

    6.  Use traditional sources (books, journals, newspapers, magazines) for research; use the internet for research (Standards 1.2;  2;  3;  4;  5)

SPA 3600 Caribbean Studies                                                                                                            Pelaz

Caribbean cultures and Literatures. In this class, the student will gain a basic understanding of the Spanish Caribbean cultures (Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic). We will analyze subjects such as film, literature, food, music and religion. As a theoretical background to better understand these cultural practices, we will work with Postcolonial theory and its foundational texts. Reading for the class will be in Spanish as well as class discussions. Writing skills will be practiced through short reflections papers.

Advanced Spanish I is a requirement. Students may take Spanish Advanced 2 concurrently with this class.

SPA 3600 Migration and Exile literatures and cultures                                                                    Pelaz

“The people who have emigrated (there are a hundred and twenty thousand of them) and the people who have been silenced and removed from their jobs (there are half a million of them) are fading like a procession moving off into the mist. They are invisible and forgotten” (Milan Kundera. The book of the laughter and Forgetting, 23)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the literatures generated by the condition called exile and migration movements. Questions regarding current events on immigration and politics, national and individual identity, nationalisms and the idea of nation, language and memory will be discussed in the class. Moreover, through the different readings we will construct a transatlantic approach to literatures and cultures. In addition, the course will pursue the development of the four communicative skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Therefore, the course will be based on the close reading and in-class discussion of the designated texts.

Advanced Spanish I is a requirement. Students may take Spanish Advanced 2 concurrently with this class.


SPA 3100 Advanced 1                                                                                                                          Pelaz
COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES: This course, which is required for the major, is designed to help the learner develop increased accuracy and sophistication in writing in Spanish for academic purposes and continued oral practice at the advanced level in Spanish. These are the goals of this course:

  1. Write effectively at the ACTFL Advanced level, presenting information, concepts and ideas on a variety of topics, using the four major modes of writing:  description, narration, exposition (analysis, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect), argumentation. (Standards  1.3;  2;  3;  4.2)

    2.  Take notes in Spanish from written texts and from oral sources for use in formulating and expressing their own ideas. (Standards  1.2,  2;  3)

    3.  Use Microsoft Word in Spanish to produce essays and other written material.

    4.  Edit successfully their own written work, recognizing deficiencies in clarity, organization, support, grammar and mechanics. (Standards  1.3,  4.1)

    5.  Use complex structures of Spanish grammar in contextualized exercises with consistency; use these structures in composition with some inconsistencies and inaccuracies. Produce writing that is generally comprehensible to native readers. (Standards 1.3;  4.1)

    6.  Use traditional sources (books, journals, newspapers, magazines) for research; use the internet for research (Standards 1.2;  2;  3;  4;  5)

Humanities Courses
Spring

HUM 3100/FRE 3600        French History, Literature, and Culture through Film                                              Brown  

This course will make use of readings and film as windows to the study of French history, literature, and culture. The two required texts focus on French history and modern French culture.  Additional readings will include information on particular films, articles dealing with French culture and social issues, and excerpts from French works of literature.  The readings and the films chosen for this course will be organized into various thematic units: film adaptations of French literature; historical events depicted in film; social issues explored by film, particularly issues of integration; war and its effects.  Since this is a cross-listed course, the course will be taught in English and the readings are in English.  The films will be shown in French with English subtitles.  Film reflection papers of 1-2 pages will be required of all students.  All students will take exams on the readings assigned.  Students taking the course for FRE credit will be required to write all of their course work in French and will be required to meet an additional hour per week with the instructor to discuss the course work in French.  

HUM 2895/SPAN 3600: Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in Latin America                                                   Esquival-King

This course explores issues of gender, race, and ethnicity, particularly focusing on culture and the Jewish and Afro diaspora within Latin America. This course will focus on the “problems” of race versus ethnicity. It explores the historical construction of gender and race in modern Latin America and their connections with the processes of class and national formation in the region. Race, ethnicity, and gender are powerful coordinates in the network of domination, for both the oppressors and the victims’. Some of the questions of this course are: How did Latin Americans construct and interpret racial, ethnic and gender identities and ideologies? And how these interpretations and ideologies have been used to formulate an idea of nation? This course talks about the different ways ethnicity and race have been defined in the Latin America studies (historiography) and the ideologies and practices associated with these categories.


HUM 2895.03: Social Movements and Revolutions in Latin America                                                     Esquival-King

The course “Revolutions and Social Movements in Modern Latin America” focuses on revolutions, dictatorships, and political and social movements from independence to the present. Throughout this class we will consider the history of individual countries, while at the same time analyzing the effect, influence and relevance of various historical events on the region as a whole.

“Revolutions and Social Movements in Modern Latin America” begins with the tumultuous nineteenth century and the Wars of Independence. In focusing on state formation and national identity, the first section of this course aims to understand the dramatic social, cultural, and political impact of Latin America’s post-Independence political conflicts and modernizing growth. Next the course will shift to the twentieth-century, starting with Mexico’s great revolution and then moving forward to analyze other revolutions and social movements in Guatemala, Cuba and Nicaragua. The following section of this class will consider the rise and fall of military dictatorships in South America, including those in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. In this part of the course students will analyze the search for social justice and reform, and the ways in which ordinary people fought against repression. We also will examine the rise and fall of export economies and industrialization, poverty, and social reform in Venezuela, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. The final weeks of the course will be devoted to issues facing Latin America today, including the complex issue of drugs in Colombia and Mexico, and immigration.

Several themes appear throughout the course. An analysis of Latin American revolutionaries is crucial to the study of the region, and this course will examine the legend and myth of Che Guevara. We also will consider the role of the U.S. and international institutions in the politics, economics and culture of Latin America, as well as the narratives used to justify foreign intervention in the region. Additionally, special lectures will explore culture in Latin America, including movies, literature, and artists, such as the painter Frida Kahlo. Gender and ethnicity are important elements as well, and women and race are integrated throughout our studies.

HUM 3015    Junior Cornerstone: Italian Culture through Films                                                                       Muccini
Spring first 8 weeks                         

In this section of Junior Cornerstone, we will be focusing on major Italian films in order to gain an overview of the dramatic economic, social and political changes in Italian society from the beginning of the 20th century through today. We will watch movies that examine the political, economic, social and psychological problems Italy faced during Fascism and in the aftermath of World War II.  Next we will examine films that portray Italy during the years of the economic miracle (1957-1962) to show both prosperity in some classes and regions of Italian society and continuing economic and social problems in others. We will also examine the social tensions, violence, corruption, mafia terror, and lack of confidence in the institutions and national identity which still plague the country. The course is conducted in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary. The course will include a class project and presentations.

HUM 2000/ITL3010 Italian Food, Fashion, and Film (Crosslisted)                                                                     Muccini
Spring second 8 weeks            

Italian fashion, films, and food are icons of culture and style, both in Italy itself and worldwide. This course will explore how these “3 Fs” have shaped perceptions of Italians around the world. The course will also deal with the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of contemporary Italy and at the same time will draw links between past (Renaissance, Futurism) and present, evidencing the importance of tradition and history in Italian society. In the context of that overview, we will study the key elements of Italian cultural identity: traditional elements such as cinema and cuisine, as well as contemporary cultural phenomena such as fashion, the culture of the coffee shop and of moto-scooters in a crowded urban setting. In addition to introducing students to one of the richest literary and cultural traditions in Europe, this course also serves an intellectual foundation for students who are thinking about studying abroad in Italy. The course is conducted in English. Students who want to take this class for Italian credit need to contact the instructor.

Summer 

HUM 2895/GER 3600 German History through Film       Summer I                                                            Schwarzmeier
This course is designed to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to Germany in the 20th and 21st century, its history and culture. The films we will watch will be in German with English subtitles. Each film will depict a specific aspect of German history and cover a broad spectrum, from Germany’s Nazi-Past, the Holocaust and resistance against Hitler to life and its challenges in the divided and later reunited Germany. To enrich the experience, students will also have to read some texts about German history and culture.

The course will be taught in English. Students who would like to take it for German credit will have to meet with the instructor for an additional class meeting of 75 minutes per week which will be conducted in German to further improve their language skills.

HUM 2000 Italian Food and Books       Summer I                                                                                            Muccini
This 5-week online course has a twofold structure. On one side, it will investigate how the development of the Italian culinary tradition and the variety of eating habits mirror the historical and economical changes that occurred in Italian society over the centuries. We will embark on a journey across time, social classes and geographical regions. On the other side, the course will analyze images of food in literary works (from Dante to Futurism, to more contemporary writers) in order to understand how food became an important defining element of “Italianness” and “Italicity” in the common imaginary. While the core of the syllabus centers on Italian culture and society, we will also look at it transnationally. In particular, we will reserve a section of the course to the Italian-American interpretation of Italian cuisine, as well as to Italian American authors and their literary representations of food. Literary texts include, but are not limited to: Dante, Boccaccio, Manzoni, Leopardi, Verga, Marinetti, Camilleri, Jerre Mangione. All materials for the course is available online (no textbook purchases necessary!) and the course is structured to accommodate distance learners and/or summer travel schedules. This course is conducted in English. No knowledge of Italian is necessary.

SPANISH classes in Nashville at Belmont University 

Summer Session 1                                          SPA 1010 (4 credit hrs.) 12 – 2:10 p.m.                    Prof. Brown

(June 1 – July 2, 2020)                                    SPA 2010 (3 credit hrs.)  9:30 -11:15 a.m.                 Prof. Pelaz

 

Summer Session 2 / July:                              SPA 1020 (4 credit hrs.)  12 -2:10 p.m.                       Prof. Boero

(July 6 – August 4, 2020)                                SPA 2020 (3 credit hrs.)  9:30 -11:15 a.m.                   Prof. Boero

The summer can be a wonderful time to learn Spanish on the Belmont University campus in Nashville. Classes tend to have fewer students, they meet every day of the week, and they progress at a steady and intense pace, all of which makes it easier for many students to excel in them. If you are interested in taking any of these Spanish classes on campus this summer and have any questions about what to expect, reach out to Professors Boero (paulo.boero@belmont.edu), Brown (cheryl.brown@belmont.edu), or Pelaz (natalia.pelaz@belmont.edu .

REGISTRATION for on-campus, summer 2020 Spanish classes is open now until June and July, 2020.