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Course Descriptions

Spring and Summer 2018
Spring

CHN 3020    Advanced Chinese     Li

Chinese 3020 is the third year and the 6th semester of the sequential Chinese language study, which represents an advanced stage of Chinese language acquisition.  Advanced Chinese will continue focusing on the development and integration of students’ four language skills.  In addition to the further learning of extensive grammar, this course will also aim to enlarge students’ vocabulary immensely, enhance students’ reading and writing abilities, and improve their spoken proficiency in communicating thoughts fluently regarding a wide range of topics. It will continue to develop students’ appreciation for and knowledge of Chinese culture.

FRE 2100 Intermediate Studies  Brown

French 2100 is an intermediate-level French course designed to provide a bridge to more advanced courses.  This course places strong emphasis on reading skill development through constant reinforcement of reading strategies.  Reading will be, therefore, placed alongside speaking and listening as an active language skill.  The skills of listening, speaking, and writing will continue to be reinforced.  Class discussions will concentrate on the readings.  Practice will also be provided in writing and revision, through frequent writing assignments.  Various aspects of the cultures of the francophone world will be discussed as frames to better understand the writers and the writing studied.  Because your developing ability to use the French that you know is important, your active participation in class discussion is strongly encouraged.  This class will be conducted entirely in French.  French 2100 is enthusiastically recommended to students who intend to take 3000-level French courses.

FRE 3600.01 French Phonetics   Brown

This course is designed to teach the French sound system primarily through the principle of contrastive analysis of French and English.  This principle will be applied to explanations of French articulation, explanations of typical pronunciation errors caused by English interferences, as well as to auditory discrimination exercises.  The student, therefore, becomes aware of how he or she pronounces English, how French differs from English, and what elements cause pronunciation problems.  The audio program that accompanies the textbook will be used extensively for active practice of French pronunciation and for auditory discrimination exercises.  Finally, the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) will be taught and practiced extensively through phonetic transcription of texts.

FRE 3600.02/HUM 3100.01 French History, Literature, and Culture through Film     Brown
This course will use film as a window to the study of French history, literature, and culture. The two required texts focus on French history and modern French culture.  Additional readings will include information on particular films, articles dealing with social issues, and excerpts from French works of literature.  The readings and the films chosen for this course will be organized into various thematic units: film adaptations of French literature; historical events depicted in film; social issues explored by film, particularly issues of integration; war and its effects.  Since this is a cross-listed course, the course will be taught in English and the readings are in English.  The films will be shown in French with English subtitles.  Film reflections and summaries of readings will be required of all students.  Students taking the course for FRE credit will be required to write all of their course work in French and will be required to meet an additional hour per week with the instructor to discuss the course work in French.

GER 3010.01G German Studies I   Schwarzmeier
This class is designed as a survey course in German history, philosophy, literature, and culture from 1740 to 1848. GER3020, which is the continuation of this course, will cover the time from 1848 to 1933.

This course will be taught in German and combine practice in oral and written expression with the close study of selected readings in the original.

GER 3500.01G  German Poetry   Schwarzmeier
This course is designed as a survey course in which the main literary trends and major figures in German poetry from the Middle Ages to the present will be studied.

The class will be conducted in German and combine the close study of selected works in the original with practice in oral and written expression.

 ITL 3120 Introduction to Italian Literature    Muccini
(HUM/ITL Cross-listed Course CRN 24146) This course is a chronological survey of Italian literature from the fourteenth century (Boccaccio) to the twentieth century (Moravia, Calvino, Levi, etc.). Through selected readings, and original texts students will familiarize themselves with the main genres, ideas, and movements of Italian literature, and will be able to develop a critical understanding of the close link that exists between Italian literature and the society and culture it represents. Special emphasis will also be given to literary and cultural backgrounds of the authors and their works (the material of the course is in Italian).

SPA 3600.02/Special Topics in Spanish: Film and Literature for Proficiency    Boero
Tuesdays & Thursdays: 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
(Class will meet occasionally on Mondays from 3 to 5 p.m. to watch assigned films) 
This class is structured to help students continue developing their Spanish proficiency at the advanced to superior levels through critical engagement with a variety of cultural texts (films, short stories, theater plays, comic strips, song lyrics, etc.). These texts will be organized thematically to help students explore key aspects of Hispanic life and culture from a variety of perspectives.

Almost all, if not all, films will be screened with either English or Spanish subtitles. On occasion, class will meet on Mondays from 3 to 5 p.m. to watch an assigned film. The course calendar will list the Monday dates students need to set aside to attend these screenings. 

Prior to enrolling in this class, you should have completed SPA 3100 and SPA 3110 at Belmont. University, or their equivalent at another institution.  If this is not the case for you, or if you have any questions regarding your preparedness to successfully participate in this class, please reach out to Prof. Boero.

SPA 3600.03G  Special Topics in Spanish: Islamic, Christian and Jewish Cultural, Spiritual and Artistic Traditions in Medieval and Early Modern Spain       McCoy
Wednesdays: 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm.
Communities constructed by Jews, Christians and Muslims in Spain from 711 to 1492 yielded mixtures of traditions, cultures and beliefs while all claiming Abraham as their patriarch. What did cultural productions in a multicultural Spain look like during these years? What borrowings from separate faiths/cultures/traditions occurred and how did religious pluralism impact customs and practices thereby creating a unique hybridity? By reading and interpreting representative literary and spiritual writings produced by adherents to these faiths, seeing films to help understand the historical contexts, and sampling musical works by composers of the time, students will learn to interpret the richness of Spanish spiritual identities. Representative authors we will read include Maimonides, Santa Teresa de Jesús, San Juan de la Cruz, Ibn Suhayd, and Ibn Hazm. A recent translation by Julio A. Sierra Un mundo desaparecido: la convivencia de musulmanes,cristianos y judíos en la España del siglo XIII will serve to develop understandings of the socio-historical setting in which these authors wrote their spiritual and literary works. The course will be facilitated in Spanish.

Prior to enrolling in this class, you should have completed SPA 3100 and SPA 3110 at Belmont University, or their equivalent at another institution.  If this is not the case for you, or if you have any questions regarding your preparedness to successfully participate in this class, please reach out to Prof. McCoy at mitch.mccoy@belmont.edu.

SPA 3110 Advanced II    Pelaz
This course, which is required for the major, is designed to help the learner develop increased accuracy and sophistication in writing in Spanish for academic purposes and continued oral practice in Spanish. To this end, there will be ample writing and revising practice, with a focus on specific grammatical and lexical areas, customized to the needs of the students enrolled in the course. A number of literary and popular texts are included.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Write effectively at the ACTFL Advanced level, presenting information, concepts and ideas on a variety of topics, using the four major modes of writing: description, narration, exposition (analysis, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect), argumentation. (Standards  1.3;  2;  3;  4.2)

  2. Take notes in Spanish from written texts and from oral sources for use in formulating and expressing their own ideas. (Standards 1.2,  2;  3)

  3. Use Microsoft Word in Spanish to produce essays and other written material.

  4. Edit successfully their own written work, recognizing deficiencies in clarity, organization, support, grammar and mechanics. (Standards 1.3,  4.1)

  5. Use complex structures of Spanish grammar in contextualized exercises with consistency; use these structures in composition with some inconsistencies and inaccuracies. Produce writing that is generally comprehensible to native readers. (Standards 1.3; 4.1)

  6. Use traditional sources (books, journals, newspapers, magazines) for research; use the internet for research and for communication with colleagues in Spanish-speaking countries and via the class discussion list. (Standards 1.2;  2;  3;  4;  5)

 

Humanities Courses

HUM 3100.01/FRE 3600.02  French History, Literature, and Culture through Film  Brown

This course will use film as a window to the study of French history, literature, and culture. The two required texts focus on French history and modern French culture.  Additional readings will include information on particular films, articles dealing with social issues, and excerpts from French works of literature.  The readings and the films chosen for this course will be organized into various thematic units: film adaptations of French literature; historical events depicted in film; social issues explored by film, particularly issues of integration; war and its effects.  Since this is a cross-listed course, the course will be taught in English and the readings are in English.  The films will be shown in French with English subtitles.  Film reflections and summaries of readings will be required of all students.  Students taking the course for FRE credit will be required to write all of their course work in French and will be required to meet an additional hour per week with the instructor to discuss the course work in French. 

HUM 2000 Introduction to Italian Literature    Muccini      (HUM/ITL Cross-listed Course CRN 24489)   
Lecture and discussion in English. Major writers, readings and textual analysis on a broad selection of texts from different genres and periods: poetry, fiction, theater, and essay. Emphasis on study of Italian literature in its cultural context. Close reading approach. Prerequisite: None

Maymester

Study Abroad Program

ITL2950-3950 Italian Civilization and Culture 3 credit hours (lecture hours and field trips) Muccini
This course, conducted entirely in Italian, is an exploration of principal figures, themes and styles of major twentieth century writers. The course will introduce students to Italian prose and poetry through the study of anthological passages by well-known Italian writers.  Class discussions will include both a linguistic and literary approach.  Reading of representative texts of prose and poetry will illustrate different cultural models. This course is intended to strengthen reading and speaking skills and to introduce students to the rich heritage of Italy. Furthermore, this course will increase vocabulary and develop skills in literary criticism (the course is in Italian).

ITL 2950-3950 Conversation and Composition     3 credit hours    Muccini
A course in spoken and written Italian, with emphasis on precision and fluency in the spoken form. Selected texts are read. The readings expose students to a variety of writing styles and expand their vocabulary in the context of Italian life (the course is in Italian).

Objective: To develop proficiency in the target language. To explore topics in depth and to communicate in public (through presentations). To learn cultural history of Italy and experience it.

HUM 2950 Italian Civilization and Culture  3 credit hours (lecture hours and field trips) Muccini

The course will explore the meaning of the term 'Renaissance' when applied to the Italian history. The subject will be approached from a variety of standpoints: social, political, intellectual, religious, and artistic. Some significant authors and their works will be discussed, including Girolamo Savonarola. Readings and lectures will be supplemented by a number of visits to key historical sites in Italy. This course will also offer students a comparative study of folklore, including social festivities, rituals, traditional food, and festivals in Italy (The course is in English).

Summer

ITL 3370/HUM 3895 Italian Cinema Summer II – 2018     Muccini
Like the people who crowded the movie theater in Nuovo Cinema Paradiso , you will stare, wonder, laugh, or cry, while watching different stories about the dramas, dreams and accomplishments of Italians in the last 70 years or so. Come to the movies to learn about Italian culture and language.

We will study major Italian films in order to gain an overview of the dramatic economic, social and political changes in Italian society over the last 70 years or so. We will begin with Amarcord where Fellini shows the tragedy of Fascism through his characters. Then, we will watch the Neorealist classics Open City and The Bicycle Thief in order to examine the political, economic, social and psychological problems Italy faces in the aftermath of World War II.  Next we will examine films that portray Italy during the years of the economic miracle (1957-1962) to show both prosperity in some classes and regions of Italian society and continuing economic and social problems in others (Big Deal on Madonna Street).  We will also examine the social tensions, violence, corruption, mafia terror, and lack of confidence in the institutions and national identity which still plague the country. The course is in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is necessary. For students of Italian, however, some assignments will be in Italian.

GENERAL OBJECTIVES: 

  1. To learn about Italy’s political, economic, social, and cultural history over the last seventy years or so. 

  2. To study characters, plots, and themes of Italian films in relation to the changes in Italian society over the past seventy years.  

  3. To acquire a broad overview of Italy’s post-War reconstruction, providing an acquaintance with the issues affecting ordinary Italians through critical consideration of the ideas, the contexts, and the practices of filmmakers and film commentators in this period.

  4. To learn how to analyze films as representations of political, social, and economic history and to consider unavoidable biases that affect such representations.

  5. To appreciate and enjoy Italian films in a wide variety of genres (neorealism, auteur films, commedia all’italiana).

SPANISH Classes on Belmont Campus

Summer Session 1                   SPA 1010 (4 credit hrs.)          12 – 2:10 p.m.             Prof. Boero
(June 4 – July 6, 2018)
                                                SPA 2010 (3 credit hrs.)          9:30 -11:15 a.m.          Prof. Boero

Summer Session 2 / July:        SPA 1020 (4 credit hrs.)          12 -2:10 p.m.               Prof. Julseth
(July 9 – August 7, 2018)
                                                SPA 2020 (3 credit hrs.)          9:30 -11:15 a.m.          Prof. Julseth

The summer can be a wonderful time to learn Spanish on the Belmont University campus. Classes tend to have fewer students, they meet every day of the week, and they progress at a steady and intense pace, all of which makes it easier for many students to excel in them. If you are interested in taking any of these Spanish classes on campus this summer and have any questions about what to expect, reach out to Professor Boero (paulo.boero@belmont.edu) or Professor Julseth (david.julseth@belmont.edu).

REGISTRATION for on-campus, summer 2018 Spanish classes is open now until May.