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Course Descriptions



FRESHMAN YEAR, FALL SEMESTER

HON 1517. World Traditions of Faith & Reason (3). An exploration of traditions by which peoples and culture around the world have utilized art, literature, politics, music, religion, philosophy, and history to explore faith and reason as ways of knowing.  A discussion, group-orientated, and media/project-centered course. 

HON 1520. Classical Civilizations (3). An exploration of the humanities during the period of antiquity, examining the interconnectedness of art, literature, politics, music, historical events, religion, philosophy, and other fields of knowledge, with a focus on the birth and development of early cultures, cultural artifacts, and cultural value systems.  A discussion, group-orientated, and media/projected-centered course designed to explore the humanities during the period of antiquity.  

FRESHMAN YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER

HON 1370. Tutorial Explorations (1). This course is required of and open only to students in the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics track.  The first course in a sequence of directed research training experiences in the sciences or mathematics during weekly one-hour meetings (or an equivalent series of directed experiences) with a faculty tutor in that field.

HON 2110. The Medieval World (3). An exploration of the humanities during the period of the Middle Ages, examining the interconnectedness of art, literature, politics, music, historical events, religion, philosophy, and other fields of knowledge, with a focus on the origins of modern representative government, universities, languages and literatures, science, and philosophies. A discussion, group-oriented, and media/project-centered course designed to explore further the humanities during the period of the Middle Ages.

Sophomore Year, Fall Semester

HON 2370. Sophomore Foundations (1). This course is required of and open only to students in the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics track.  Consists of directed research training in the sciences or mathematics during weekly one-hour meetings (or an equivalent series of directed experiences) with a faculty tutor in that field, continuing the work begun in HON 2360: Sophomore Tutorial. 
 
HON 2520. The Age of Exploration (3). An exploration of the humanities between the years 1500 and 1700, examining the interconnectedness of art, literature, politics, music, historical events, religion, philosophy, and other fields of knowledge, with a focus on the Renaissance and Reformation.  A discussion, group-oriented, and media/project-centered course designed to explore further the humanities between the years 1500 and 1700.

SOPHOMORE YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER

HON 2360. Sophomore Tutorial (1). This course is required of and open to students in the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics track.  Consists of directed research training in the sciences or mathematics during weekly one-hour meetings (or an equivalent series of directed experiences) with a faculty tutor in that field, continuing the work begun in HON 1370: Tutorial Foundations.

HON 2400. Societies, Institutions, and Teams (3). This course is required for all students in Project LEAD and open only to students in this track.  An overview of the workings of societies, institutions, and small groups, with an emphasis on processes for developing an institution or small groups' capabilities to reach and sustain its optimum level of performance, including the use of intervention practices to facilitate change, an exploration of alternatives to traditional hierarchical models, and the development of strategies for influencing large-scale and group decision making.  As a foundational course in Project LEAD, the Leadership-Intensive track of the Honors Program, the course will assist the student in developing an understanding of Systems Thinking and Planning, Organizations and Organizational Change, Research and Inquiry, Leadership and Advocacy, Team Building, Communication, Character, Ethics, and Creativity.

HON 2444. Masterworks (3). This course is required of and open only to students in the scholarship track in the humanities, social sciences, or related fields.  An examination of important and influential studies, writings, films, and photographs, recordings, and other products from the humanities and social sciences, with an emphasis on essential works from the student's field of study.  

HON 2488. The Critical Eye (3). This course is required of and open only to students in the Artist's Studio.  An examination of important and influential works from the fields of music, art, literature, and drama, and the criteria by which those works have acquired their standing, with an emphasis on essential works from the student's field of study.

HON 2600. Discovery and Revolution (3). An exploration of the humanities between the years 1700 and 1900, examining the interconnectedness of art, literature, politics, music, historical events, religion, philosophy, and other fields of knowledge, with a focus on the Age of Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Era.  A discussion, group-orientated, and media/project-centered course designed to explore further the humanities between the years 1700 and 1900.

JUNIOR YEAR, FALL SEMESTER

HON 3350. Junior Tutorial (1). This course is required of and open only to students in the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics track.  Consists of directed research training in the sciences or mathematics during weekly one-hour meetings (or an equivalent series of directed experiences) with a faculty tutor in that field, continuing the work begun in HON 2370: Tutorial Explorations.

HON 3400. Leadership and Advocacy (3). This course is required for all students in Project LEAD and open only to students in this track.  An overview of principles for leading and changing societies, institutions, and teams, along with strategies for the planning and execution of large-scale projects and social movements, with a focus on principles of tactical and strategic planning, leadership concepts critical to operational success and group loyalty, and ethical principles necessary for courageous and inspirational leadership.  As a foundational course in Project LEAD, the Leadership-Intensive track of the Honors Program, the course will assist the student in developing an understanding of Leadership and Advocacy, Systems Thinking and Planning, Organizations and Organizational Change, Research and Inquiry, Team Building, Character, Communication, Ethics, Style, and Creativity.

HON 3444. Theory and Interpretation (3). This course is required of and open only to students in the scholarship track in the humanities, social sciences, or related fields.  A holistic understanding of the way cultural critics and public intellectuals do their work, with an introduction into the breadth of tools they often have at their disposal.  The course looks back at Masterworks (HON 2444) to evaluate the criteria by which those important and influential studies, writings, films, and photographs, recordings, and other products from the humanities and social sciences have acquired their standing, with an emphasis on essential works from the student's field of study.

HON 3488. Beauty and Truth (3). This course is required of and open only to students in the Artist's Studio.  A holistic understanding of the way artists, novelists, actors, composers, playwrights, and musicians do their work, with an emphasis on the criteria by which those artists make their aesthetic choices.  The course builds upon the insights gleaned from The Critical Eye (HON 2488) to examine the perception, interpretation, and expression of beauty and truth in music, art, literature, and drama, with an emphasis on providing a framework necessary to undertake creative projects in the student's field of study.

Any of the First Five Semesters

HON 2310: Analytics: Science Models (4).  An exploration of the interconnectedness of the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, philosophy, and other areas of scientific knowledge, as well as techniques of the scientific method and its application across diverse scientific disciplines, with an emphasis on knowledge developed since the 19th Century.  The student should consider the scheduled lab period as an integrated part of the course and should not attempt to work out individual scheduling of lab sessions with the instructor. 
 
HON 3310. Analytics: Math Models (4). An exploration of techniques of critical reasoning, with an emphasis on the development of the art of such reasoning, its interconnectedness with mathematics, the sciences, philosophy, and other areas of knowledge, and its use as a critical tool in the mathematical disciplines, especially areas developed since the 19th Century, including logic, graph theory, and chaos theory.  The student should consider the scheduled lab period as an integrated part of the course and should not attempt to work out individual scheduling with the instructor. (All Science and Math majors should take this within first two semesters)

Any Semester

HON 3110. Topics in the 20th & 21st Century Global, (3).  Focuses closely on important aspects of the humanities during the 20th and 21st centuries, examining the interconnectedness of fields of knowledge in the changing nature of aesthetic and cultural values across the 20th and 21st centuries, yet using a tighter lens to focus on a foundational or symbolic component of the broader change being studied.  A discussion, group-orientated, and media/project-centered course designed to explore further the humanities during the 20th and 21st centuries. 

HON 3120. Topics in the 20th & 21st Century America, (3). Prerequisite: Membership in Honors Program. Honors Global Topics is a required, regularly offered seminar style course designed to be taken after HON 2600. Topics differ, but each offering is based on a theme and subject matter that are substantially American that was or has been significant in American life over the past century. The approaches by the professor may be social science or humanities in approach, comparative, disciplinary, or multidisciplinary in nature

JUNIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER

HON 3045: Writing Workshop (3).  An advanced writing course in which Honors Program students address the particular demands of the long-form, extensive research thesis, creative product, or community project report.  Each participant in the workshop will develop or refine his or her thesis/project prospectus, secure a faculty member to direct the thesis/project (except students in Project LEAD), and conduct research related to the thesis/project.  Prospecti should be approved before the end of the junior year, as the student may not enroll for HON 4360 or HON 4000 until the prospectus is approved by the Honors Council.

HON 3360: Thesis Prospectus Planning (1). This course is required of and open only to students in the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics.  Consists of directed research in the sciences or mathematics leading to the development of a formal research proposal for the honors thesis, culminating in a formal presentation of the proposal to and official approval by the Honors Council.  The tutor serves as director of the thesis research, and as chair of a three-person committee that advises and approves the final thesis.

Senior Year, Fall Semester

HON 4350: Thesis Research (1). This course is required of and open only to students in the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics track. Directed research on the student's approved thesis topic.  The course is designed to provide the student not only with a specific time to focus on his or her research for the thesis, but guidance in the research process from the student's tutor.  To facilitate that, the student will report to weekly one-hour meetings with his or her faculty tutor in order to monitor the student's progress and address issues related to the research.
 
HON 4400. Team Project Execution (3). This course is required for all students in Project LEAD and open only to students in this track. The execution and successful completion of the major team project developed in HON 4000: Team Project Coordination, demonstrating skills in large-scale project planning, applied research and analysis, problem-identification and solution-generation, communication and management techniques and practices, and reporting outcomes to appropriate audiences in both written documentation and public presentation.  Completion of the team project is regarded as the capstone experience of Project LEAD, the Leadership-Intensive track of the Honors Program.  It represents the ultimate expression of the skills developed by the student during the undergraduate course of study through the application of the major area to a real-world experience.  The results of the project are presented publicly in a forum appropriate to the project, as well as produce a final printed report to be bound and awarded to each student on the team.  To facilitate that, the team is to submit six to seven copies of the report printed on 100% cotton paper (one for each team member, plus two additional copies) to the Honors Office.  The library receives one copy and the Honors Office keeps the other for its archives.

SENIOR YEAR, SPRING SEMESTER

HON 4000. Team Project Coordination (1). This course is required for all students in Project LEAD, the Leadership-Intensive track of the Honors Program, and open only to students in this track.  The development of a working plan for a major team project of a scale large enough to require the involvement and integration of participants who are not members of the team - volunteers, contractors, performers, etc. - with an emphasis on the development and application of criteria for the formulation of a project best designed to utilize and demonstrate the skills and training of the students on the team.  Teams will work with community agencies and/or sponsoring organizations from government or business to design a substantial "real world" project that addresses an issue important to the team as engaged citizens, as well as offering long-term benefits to the community.  

HON 4360. Thesis Writing (3). This course is required of and open only to students in The Artist's Studio, the Scholarship: Humanities and Social Sciences track, or the Scholarship: Sciences and Mathematics track. Students in Artist's Studio and the Humanities and Social Sciences track will take this in the fall semester of their senior year. The production of a research thesis or creative work, executed with the highest level of undergraduate research or artistic skill in that field and including both written documentation and public presentation of the research or creative product.  A student may not enroll for this course unless his or her thesis/creative project prospectus has been approved by the Honors Council.
 
HON 4820: Senior Honors Colloquium (0). Consists of three components: the transition to the student's next phase of life, writing of the Personal Credo, and completion and submission of the thesis/creative project.  The class will discuss the completion of requirements for graduation and details for approval and public presentation of the thesis/creative project.



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