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Belmont University | Belief in Something Greater

All Courses

English Courses (ENG)
The following courses are offered on a three-year rotation. At least two courses are offered each semester and in the summer sessions.

ENG 5000. Practical Literary Criticism (3). This course offers the opportunity to research and study selected works of literature from a variety of contemporary theoretical approaches. It aims to increase students' ability to evaluate and apply these approaches. Required for M.A. students. Recommended for M.Ed. students.

ENG 5040. History of the English Language (3). (offered concurrently with ENG 3500).The origins and development of the English Language are studied in the context of linguistics and socio-political influences. Attention is also paid to the on-going processes affecting modern English.

ENG 5700. Practicum in Scholarly Editing (1-3). Participation is by invitation only. Course is repeatable, but maximum credit earned in ENG 5700 is 3 credit hours. Under supervision of faculty who are active editors of a scholarly journal or are engaged in a scholarly-editing project, students will participate in all phases of the selecting and editing process. The supervising faculty member and student should develop a contract about editorial work to be completed by the student and the study/reading component to be undertaken together, taking into account the number of credit hours; students earning 3 credit hours in this Practicum should also write a substantial essay about the editorial process, their learning process, etc.

ENG 5720. Practicum in Pedagogy (1-3). Course is repeatable (two times total), but maximum credit earned in ENG 5720 is 3 credit hours.Under the supervision of faculty who are teaching an undergraduate course, students will assist and participate in all phases of the teaching process: preparation, classroom instruction, evaluation, etc. The supervising faculty member and student should develop a contract about work to be completed by the student and the study / reading component to be undertaken together, taking into account the number of credit hours; students taking 3 credit hours in the Practicum, making it the equivalent of a full course, should also write a substantial essay about teaching, their own teaching experiences and learning processes, etc.

ENG 5730. Pedagogical Studies (3). This course introduces students to pedagogies used in teaching literature, language and / or writing. In addition to reading and discussing the various pedagogical approaches, students will apply them by assisting a professor in teaching, tutoring, and / or conferencing with students on their papers. Other related assignments will include writing learning goals, designing assignments, developing rubrics and other assessments tools, etc.

ENG 5800. Readings in World Literature I (3).This course presents important works of literature of the world from beginnings to Enlightenment. This course establishes a historical perspective while seeking to encourage both comparative perspective and common ground among works from European tradition and several non-Western cultures.

ENG 5810. Readings in British Literature I (3).Readings emphasizing the historical development of British literature from a broad spectrum of representative works from Old English up to the Elizabethan period.

ENG 5820. Readings in British Literature II (3). Readings emphasizing the historical development of British literature from a broad spectrum of representative works from the Elizabethan period through the eighteenth century.

ENG 5830. Readings in American Literature I (3). Readings emphasizing the historical development of American literature from a broad spectrum of representative works, from beginnings through the Civil War.

ENG 5840. Readings in World Literature II (3).This course presents important works of literature of the world from the Enlightenment to the present. This course establishes a historical perspective while seeking to encourage both comparative perspective and common ground among works from European tradition and several non-Western cultures.

ENG 5850. Readings in British Literature III (3).Readings emphasizing the historical development of British Literature from a broad spectrum of representative works from the Romantic period through the present.

ENG 5860. Readings in American Literature II (3). Readings emphasizing the historical development of American Literature from a broad spectrum of representative works from the Civil War to the present.

ENG 5950. Study Abroad. (1-6). Various study-abroad opportunities are available through Belmont. Consult the Director of International Studies Abroad for program details.

ENG 6000. Single / Double Author Seminar (3). Each offering of this course will be devoted to the in-depth study of one, or at most two, author(s). These authors range from Chaucer and/or Shakespeare to Jane Austen, E.M. Forster, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich, Joan Didion, as examples, etc. Deep knowledge of an author's (or two author's) oeuvre, not historical coverage, is the chief goal of the course. May be repeated once for up to six hours.

ENG 6100. Genre Seminar (3). Each offering of this course will provide a critical introduction to a single genre of writing. Seminar topics may include everything from the novel, short story, poetry, and drama, to nature or travel writing, the graphic novel, ethnography, and memoir, etc. Deep knowledge of the genre, not historical coverage, is the seminar's chief goal. May be repeated once for up to six credits.

ENG 6200. Creative Writing Seminar (3). Each offering of this course will explore the theory and practice of creative writing and an emphasis on revision. Offerings will rotate between Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Writing and the Creative Process, and other possible genres or topics. Deep experience in writing in particular genres is the chief goal of this seminar. May be repeated twice for credit up to nine hours.

ENG 6300. Special Topics in Writing (3).Each offering of this course will address a different topic or theme from disciplines of writing, rhetoric, and / or composition. Topics may include Writing about Place, Writing and Social Issues, Writing and Identity, and others. May be repeated twice for credit up to nine hours

ENG 6340. Gender Studies (3). An exploration of theories of gender; examines constructions and manipulations of gender in a variety of literary texts.

ENG 6400. Special Topics in Literature (3). Each course offering will address a different topic, issue, or theme from the disciplines of literature and/or critical theory. Deep knowledge of a topic, issue, or theme is the chief goal of the seminar. May be repeated twice for credit up to nine hours.

ENG 6420. Composition Theories (3). The course provides a basic overview of composition theories: audience analysis, writing process theory, writing to learn theory, discourse theory, invention in the rhetorical tradition. Other topics include evaluation, electronic discourse, and grammar.

ENG 6500. Special Topics in English Grammar and Linguistics (3).This course, which will vary in focus with individual offerings, builds on basic understanding of English grammar from History of the English Language by focusing on special topics in Advanced English Grammar and Linguistics. Course is repeatable once with different topics.

ENG 6600. Portfolio and Comprehensive Examination (1). This course is available by petition only, and each case will be evaluated individually by the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Advisory Committee. If the petition is granted the student must complete and submit a portfolio of representative course work and a synthesis, reflective essay that is academic in nature; the student must also pass a written comprehensive examination. The student must register for this course in the last semester prior to graduation. This course is Pass / Fail. In the event of failure of this course, the student must re-take the course until he / she passes the Portfolio and Comprehensive Exam, thereby earns a grade of "P" for the course. Should the student's committee award the student a "High Pass" the grade is still recorded as a "P."

ENG 6700. Thesis Prospectus and Research (3). Directed by the faculty mentor, the student undertakes the research and other forms of preparation necessary to write the thesis. This course is graded as a Pass / Fail. Completion and approval of the prospectus by the thesis committee are required for the student to receive a grade of "P" for this course. Successful completion of this course is a pre-requisite to registration in ENG 6800, Thesis Writing.

ENG 6800. Thesis (3). Directed by the faculty mentor, students complete all the requirements for the thesis, including a formal public presentation of their finished work. This course is graded as a Pass / Fail. Completion and approval of the thesis by all members of the thesis committee are required for the student to receive a grade of "P" for the course.

ENG 6801-6804. Thesis Continuation (1 credit hour each).Pre-requisite ENG 6700. P/F grade option only. Any student who has received an IP in ENG 6800 must enroll in this series of courses to allow for completion of that course after the original semester of enrollment. Thesis continuation sections must be taken consecutively and continuously until ENG 6800 is complete, to a maximum of 4 semesters or two years. If a student has not completed the thesis by that time, the only option for completing the M.A. in English program will be to switch at the end of that semester to the non-thesis option and complete any outstanding requirements for that program. Hours do not count toward degree hours earned for the M.A. degree.