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Belmont University | Belief in Something Greater

Current and Upcoming Courses

Online Classes

We offer all of our classes simultaneously in person and online through video conferencing. Video conferencing gives students the option to take online classes without sacrificing the real-time interactions of the classroom. For more information, please contact the director of graduate studies.


Spring 2019

ENG 5040                              History of the English Language                             Monteverde

Recognizing that any description of this course is destined to be off-putting, let me begin by stating that ideally this course should make your own language come alive for you as a living entity whose current form is the result of all its childhood experiences and whose future shape though predictable to some extent is also yet to be determined.  We will study the growth of our language from its origin as a descendant of the Indo-European language family in distant prehistory to its current position as the 2nd most widely known language in the modern world. Topics covered will include the relationship between English and other languages, the evolution of modern English grammar, and the causes of the mess we call the English spelling system (if it can be called that).  Tests will be augmented with a variety of assignments, such as a personal language history, designed to help you appreciate the on-going and individual process of change that can be experienced in the study of English. An optional service learning unit can also be taken as part of the course.  This course is required for all students pursuing secondary education licensure in English and students pursing an English Language Learners certificate.  It is also beneficial for anyone (a group which should include all people studying English literature and/or writing) who want to develop a deeper awareness and understanding of our language.

 

ENG 5860                               Readings in American Literature II                                   John

 

This course will examine the formation of America’s cultural and literary identity from the end of the Civil War to present day.  We will analyze literary texts in relation to their cultural and historical contexts.  This course expects that students demonstrate not only a knowledge of the historical development of the culture from which these texts come, but also an ability to apply analytical and interpretive skills to the examined texts and contexts through reading, writing, and critical thinking.  This is a reading intensive course, as well as a course that relies heavily on your oral and written participation.

 

ENG 6200      Creative Writing Seminar: Poetry; Documentary Poetics           McDowell


Poetry is music; poetry is magic; poetry is a real toad in an imaginary garden. Poetry is also a record of the events, people, and issues that constrict and curb both cultural and societal prosperity. The type of poetry that practices these aims is called documentary poetry: It, according to poet and scholar Philip Metres, “arises from the idea that poetry is not a museum-object to be observed from afar, but a dynamic medium that informs and is informed by the history of the moment.” We will study poetry that engages with the cultural moment and answer the following questions: Who gets to document? Who is documented? What are the formal and ethical issues inherent to documentary poetics? Students will read and respond to books of poetry and essays on the topic, as well write their own poems. Poets studied may include Javier Zamora, C.D. Wright, Philip Metres, Danez Smith, and Tarfia Faizullah. The idea that the more we know the better off we will be is challenged by documentary poetry, which exploits the subjective nature of language, and therefore questions how we use language to know, and therefore how we can engage with the world through our poems.

 

ENG 6420                  Advanced Studies in Rhetoric: Modern Tribes                  Lovvorn

How do we belong?  And how do we signal these connections? Such questions sit at the center of this course, which draws upon lenses commonly taken up in composition/rhetorical studies to explain and to describe group memberships and communications. Focusing on the linguistic and rhetorical ties that create identification with groups, the course will include discussions of constitutive rhetoric (James Boyd White), identification (Kenneth Burke), sociolinguistics (Norman Fairclough, James Gee), genre theory (Carolyn Miller, Anis Bawarshi), and theories of discourse communities and communities of practice (Étienne Wenger, James Porter, John Swales). The course will engage these ideas by way of an extended ethnographic project that applies theoretical perspectives, methods of data collection, and methods of data analysis.

Time

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Time

Tuesday

Thursday

9

ENG 2000

ENL 2210

ENG 2000

ENL 2210

ENG 2000

ENL 2210

9:30

ENL 3740

ENG 1050

ENL 3740

ENG 1050

11

ENW 2430

ENL 4350

ENW 2430

ENL 4350

ENW 2430

ENL 4350

11

ENL 2400

ENW 3895 (Stover)

ENL 2400

ENW 3895 (Stover)

12

ENL 2120

ENW 2430

ENW 3680

ENL 2120

ENW 2430

ENW 3680

ENL 2120

ENW 2430

ENW 3680

12:30

ENW 2895

ENL 3880

ENW 2895

ENL 3880

1

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

2

ENW 2510

ENL 3895

ENG 1050

ENW 2510

ENL 3895

ENG 1050

2

ENW 3420

ENW 3420

 

3:30

ENL 2340

ENW 3895 (BSW)

ENL 2340

ENW 3895 (BSW)

 

3:30

 

 

 

 

4

ENW/L 3500

ENW/L3500

 

 

 

 

6

ENG 5860

 

6

ENW 4895/ENG 6420

ENG 6200