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Belmont University | Belief in Something Greater

Course Descriptions

Course Offerings
Department of English
Fall 2019

Note: ENG 1010 is a prerequisite for all of the following courses except ENG 1050 and ENG 1895.

English Core Courses (ENG)

ENG 1050.01 and .03            Reading and Writing for English Studies                           Sisson

In this course, we will focus on learning to read texts closely and analyze them critically. We will explore a number of genres—poetry, short story, drama, and novel—and will develop the specific literary vocabulary required to write about these forms of literature carefully, deeply, and effectively.

With a focus on strengthening these skills and practices, this course aims to help you establish the life-long pursuit of reading and writing.

We will read a book of poems by a single poet; a play that is produced locally (most likely on campus), which we will attend; and fiction—i.e. short stories and a novel.

ENG 1050.02                         Reading and Writing for English Studies                           Trout

In this general education English course, students will focus on learning to read texts closely and learn to analyze critically and rhetorically. Students will read in a number of genres such as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the novel while developing the technical literary vocabulary required to write about them. Additionally, students will gain a heightened appreciation of connections, patterns, and themes. This course aims to begin students on a four-year (and ultimately lifelong) path to better, stronger, reading and writing skills. This semester we will be reading, among other texts, Shelley’s Frankenstein and O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night.

ENG 1895                              Introduction to English Studies                                          Curtis

“English majors want the joy of seeing the world through the eyes of people who—let us admit it—are more sensitive, more articulate, shrewder, sharper, more alive than they themselves are….You see that life is bigger, sweeter, more tragic and intense—more alive with meaning than you had thought.” ---Mark Edmundson

In this one credit-hour course, students will learn about the wide and varied field of English Studies, including Creative Writing, Writing and Rhetoric, and Literature, among others.  Faculty and alumni guest speakers will provide you with the ‘big picture’ about both academic study in English at Belmont and lots of first-hand information about the variety of professional opportunities for graduates. Whether you’re undecided about your major, a brand new English major or minor, or an established English major or minor trying to get more perspective on your chosen field, this course is for you. 

ENG 2000                              Critical Reading and Writing                                  John   

This course is designed to introduce English majors and minors to the nature of literary theory and writing about literature. You will be exposed to a number of critical approaches that you will practice applying to several major literary works. This is both a reading and writing intensive course. This class will also consist of serious critical discussion and will seek to develop students’ oral communication skills. Please note that this course is primarily for English majors and minors, and will not count for BELL Core Humanities credit.

ENG 3000                              Junior Seminar in English                                        Curtis

In ENG 3000, guest speakers and graduates of the program will help introduce you to a variety of career paths. It’s a great place to be thinking about what kind(s) of internship you plan on pursuing, as well as thinking about how to shape the remainder of your undergraduate experience to best prepare for life after college. Requires the preparation of a professional resume, a LinkedIn page, and other professional development activities.

This is a graduation requirement that will only be offered in the Fall. If you are graduating in December 2019 or in May or August 2020 and have not yet taken ENG 3000, you need to be in this course this semester.

ENG 3960                                          Internship                                                      Overall

The purpose of the writing internship course is to provide practical application of classroom learning in an off-campus professional setting. Students enrolled in the course are in the process of performing the work of an internship designed and approved the prior semester in collaboration with Dr. Overall, the English Department’s Internship Coordinator. The number of hours you must complete in your work as an intern at your chosen workplace varies according to the number of credit hours for which you are enrolled: 3 hours Belmont course credit = 9 hours/week (approximately 108 hours total); 2 hours Belmont course credit = 6 hours/week (approximately 72 hours total); 1 hour Belmont course credit = 3 hours/week (approximately 36 hours). Class sessions are devoted to discussions of workplace writing issues and strategies. Students write reflections in which they describe their internship experiences; complete a series of short professional-writing “cases”; and compose and design a digital portfolio with documents they produce on the job. Half of the course grade will be determined from the above assignments while the internship supervisor evaluation will determine the other half. For more information, see http://www.joeloverall.com/courses/ENG3960/

ENG 4900                              Senior Seminar in English                                        Trout

“Soon now we shall go out of the house and go into the convulsion of the world, out of history into history and the awful responsibility of time.”---Robert Penn Warren

In Senior Seminar students will engage in a semester-long reflection on and discussion about their time at Belmont as an English major and look forward to their future endeavors after graduation. Specifically students will consider the following questions: where have you been? where are you now? where are you going? We will be revisiting old writing, writing reflectively about the experience as an English major, and writing analytically and creatively about Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon and Lee Smith’s Fair and Tender Ladies. At the end of the course, students will produce an individually designed launch project tailored to their own future interests. Prerequisite: ENG 2000

Literature Courses (ENL)

ENL 2210                                           British Literature I                                        Murray

A survey of texts composed in England from ca. 800-1800:  works by anonymous Anglo-Saxon poets, Chaucer, Elizabeth I, Shakespeare, Lanyer, Mary Wroth, Sidney, Donne, Herbert, Herrick, Milton, Wycherley, Swift and Pope.  We will study epics and mock-epics, poems sacred and profane, prose deadly serious and wackily satirical.  We will study the visual, religious, political, economic and cultural backgrounds of these works.  We will consider how the first thousand years of British lit provides the basis for much of today's popular entertainment.  Although our focus will not be on linguistics, we will take note as language changes from Anglo Saxon to Middle English to Early Modern English.  Students will produce 4 short position papers, take three tests (one being the final exam), and write brief daily paragraphs.  Text:  The Broadview Anthology of English Literature, Concise Edition, Volume A.  ENL 2110 counts for English-major and minor survey requirements and for Gen. Ed. Humanities credit.

ENL 2220                               American Literature Since 1865                              Trout

American Literature Since 1865 surveys the development of America’s literature and cultural identity from the Civil War to the present. We will read the works of authors that are most often placed into convenient “isms”—Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism. We will identify these movements in America’s literature and question the validity of these handy categories. The literature of this country will be addressed from a number of historical, social, and critical perspectives. This course will foster better critical reading, writing, and research skills and encourage thoughtful oral communication. American Literature before 1865 is not a pre-requisite. ENL 2220 counts for English-major and -minor survey requirements or for BELL Core Humanities credit.

ENL 2330                                            World Literature I                                         McDonald

Though the title of this survey is daunting, the material we will read will strike you as both fresh and unfamiliar, eye-opening and perspective-altering.  We will use the Norton Anthology of World Literature, Shorter Edition, Volume 1, plus a volume of poetry by Rumi.  We will begin with one of the first and still greatest achievements in imaginative literature, the Epic of Gilgamesh.  In European literature, that draws us westward.  With this survey, we will let it lead us eastward to the Bhagavad-gita, to The Thousand and One Nights, and, from Japan, The Pillow Book and The Tale of Genji.  We will look at incredible lyric poetry from Sappho, the Chinese Classic of Poetry, Li Bo, and Du Fu, and Rumi, the great Persian poet.  We will also read early literature from Africa and from the Mayan culture of Mexico.  As we read, we will consider cultural, religious, and political context, gender, language, literary forms and genres.  We will also consider what “world literature” is, and how this context can helpfully frame our present day understanding of distinct global cultures, as well as our understanding of Western and contemporary literature.   In addition to reading intriguing texts, students will write several short critical analyses, complete class projects, and write a reflective final exam essay.

ENL 3500                               History of the English Language                             Monteverde

Recognizing that any description of this course is destined to be off-putting, let me begin by stating that ideally this course should make your own language come alive for you as a living entity whose current form is the result of all its childhood experiences and whose future shape though predictable to some extent is also yet to be determined.  We will study the growth of our language from its origin as a descendant of the Indo-European language family in distant prehistory to its current position as the 2nd most widely known language in the modern world. Topics covered will include the relationship between English and other languages, the evolution of modern English grammar, and the causes of the mess we call the English spelling system (if it can be called that).  Tests will be augmented with a variety of assignments, such as a personal language history, designed to help you appreciate the on-going and individual process of change that can be experienced in the study of English. An optional service learning unit can also be taken as part of the course.  This course is required for all students pursuing secondary education licensure in English and students pursing an English Language Learners certificate.  It is also beneficial for anyone (a group which should include all people studying English literature and/or writing) who want to develop a deeper awareness and understanding of our language.

ENL 3720                               Romanticism in England                                          Murray

The Myth of the Fall in English Romanticism
This class combines one of the great themes of world literature--the fall of mankind and loss of Paradise--with one of our era's most pressing preoccupations:  the deteriorating state of our planet and the loss of the earth as we know it.  Religion and eco-criticism.  After looking at Christian/Classical accounts of the Fall (Genesis, Hesiod, Ovid), we will read Book IX of Milton's Paradise Lost.  Then we turn to late-18th-century and early 19th-century British texts.

Texts:  Austen, Northanger Abbey; Byron, Cain; M. G. Lewis's The Monk; and the original dystopian novel, Mary Shelley's The Last Man.  Poetry of Charlotte Smith, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Percy Shelley, John Keats.

ENL 3895.01                         Shakespeare on Stage and Screen                           Yeo

This class journeys through historical and contemporary performances of Shakespeare’s plays around the world to understand how staging choices and cultural context shape his iconic work. In addition to traditional productions and big-budget films, we will explore lesser-known adaptations of Shakespeare’s work, including MacBeth set in the underworld of Mumbai, The Comedy of Errors staged as a Nashville-themed musical, and Romeo and Juliet performed on Twitter. These non-traditional performances of Shakespeare challenge popular stereotypes of the bard, raise questions over who “owns” his work, and rewrite understandings of his plays. Ultimately, we will discover a democratic Shakespeare whose work speaks to us from silver screens and small stages worldwide.

Course readings include several of Shakespeare’s plays as well as a local live performance, filmed productions, theater trailers, and performance archives. Possible assignments may include a literary analysis, a filmic or music analysis, storyboarding, and/or hands-on work with local productions. 

We will also partner with Dr. Overall's and Dr. McDonald's classes to help contribute to the Nashville Shakespeare Performance Archive. The NSPA is a website featuring Nashville-based performances of Shakespeare. The archive is hosted by Belmont's library and made possible by a grant from the Folger Shakespeare Library.

ENL 3895.02                 African Diaspora: Lit and Culture                                  H. Finch

Year of the Return: Exploring the African Diaspora’s 400-year Impact on Literature and Culture

The president of Ghana proclaims 2019 as the "year of the return" in remembrance of the horrific slave trade in efforts to unite the diaspora and reignite a sense of home and dedication to not be enslaved again. This course will explore various writers and theory that showcase the experiences of those scattered to consider their traumas, strength, and resilience and what they mean to our past, present, and future. We will engage with various aspects of literature and culture to critically think of what perspectives people of African descent offer when we consider human experiences from the African continent to stops throughout the world. May be substituted for ENL 3800, World Literature.

Writing Courses (ENW)

ENW 2100                                         Digital Literacies                                           Overall

In this course, students will work to cultivate digital literacies. In order to do so, students will critically analyze and compose within a variety of multimedia genres such as web texts, video, image creation, and digital archives. In addition to learning industry-standard publication and design software such as iMovie, Adobe Creative Cloud, and HTML/CSS coding, students will work with many modes (words, image, sound, hypertext, arrangement) of texts and will produce a variety of products that involve many different media while exploring some of the most recent theories regarding the challenges to authorship these types of products invoke. For our final project, this semester’s class will be involved in creating and presenting the Nashville Shakespeare Performance Archive in coordination with materials collected by Dr. McDonald’s and Dr. Yeo’s classes this semester. This project is made possible by a grant from the Folger Shakespeare Library and will be an actual website hosted by the Bunch Library at Belmont University. No prior experience with technology or Shakespeare is required.

ENW 2430.01 and .02           Introduction to Creative Writing                             McDowell

This course is designed to introduce you to the beginning writing of poetry and fiction. The course will also be used to develop and foster a community of working writers. Through workshopping and class discussion of your own work and readings of creative and critical texts, you will learn 1) what makes a poem or story effective to the audience of your choice; 2) how to manipulate your own life experiences, even the small, seemingly insignificant ones, into powerful poems and stories; and 3) how to learn about your own writing through the close reading of your classmates’ drafts. This class will set the groundwork for future writing by leading you through the motions of writing, revising, and rewriting. You will also gain insight into the creative process by reading past and present masters of fiction and poetry. With this new set of skills, you will be ready to embark on further writing away from class with a basic foundation in how not just to write but how to be a writer. This semester, we will focus on fiction and poetry.

ENW 2430.03                        Introduction to Creative Writing                             S. Finch

The goal of this class is for students to come away with an understanding of genre expectations for both poetry and fiction. For poetry, we will examine the writer’s attention to language, tone, line breaks, etc., and for fiction, we will focus on using specific concrete details while avoiding cliché, creating characters and scenes, and understanding how to tag dialogue. In this class, you can expect to be introduced to some of the aspects of the creative writing process that you might not be familiar with (such as workshop and revision). Finally, we will also read and discuss a number of different styles and voices in both fiction and poetry.

The ability to critique and to create are not an innate skills, and instead, you must also train yourself to be open to new ideas, to new ways of writing, new ways of reading, and even new ways of creating. As Albert Einstein said, “The mind that opens to a new idea never returns to its original size.” With this new set of skills, you will be ready to embark on further writing away from class with a basic foundation in how not just to write but how to be a writer.

ENW 2510                                         The Art of the Essay                                                 Stover

What is an essay, exactly? You may be relieved and surprised to learn that the genre is far more varied, intimate, and malleable than the reductive five-paragraph structure we have come to call an “essay.” Instead, true to Michel de Montaigne’s notion of the essay, it is a “trial” or an “attempt” to follow the pattern of one’s thinking when examining one’s experiences, observations, and inner life. We will read a wide variety of contemporary essay forms (braided, segmented, lyric), along with the more traditional personal essays from earlier periods. After reading literary criticism of the genre and essays ranging across time (from Montaigne to David Foster Wallace), students will be responsible both for their own theoretical reflections on the genre and for their own “essais” or attempts at producing the genre.

ENW 2895                                         Writers in Context                                        Stover

Designed as an introduction to composition and rhetoric, this course offers insights into how this field of study informs our identities, shapes our uses of language, and aids in our communication. Students will examine core conversations in the field and apply foundational texts as interpretive frameworks while building a critical awareness of writing and rhetoric. May be substituted for ENW 3020, Theories of Writing.

ENW 3050                 Writing and Learning: the Peer Tutoring Seminar           Pinter

In this course we will unpack all these complications by reading theories, stories, and practical advice from experienced tutors and scholars of writing. As we read and discuss theory, you will also engage in tutoring your peers both in the First-Year Seminar and in the Writing Center. Finally, you will write extensively to keep in touch with your own writing processes as you help other writers with theirs. We will share our work in the classroom, gaining even more experience in tutoring by providing feedback, guidance, and support to one a First-Year Seminar class. We will discuss which tutoring strategies work—and which don’t. Recommendation by a Belmont professor and a complete application is required. Both due by April 3 to robbie.pinter@belmont.edu. Decisions will be made by April 10

ENW3410                                          Fiction Writing                                             S. Finch

In his book, Making Shapely Fiction, Jerome Stern describes a creative writing workshop as a place where “you are learning to articulate your reactions to a story…[while] teaching yourself to look at your own work with the same critical eye.” The ability to critique is not an innate skill, and instead, writers must learn how to analyze a story through practice and instruction. For this class, we will be studying the short story. This course strives to accomplish three primary goals: to expose writers to a variety of styles, story shapes, and authors, to encourage the critical examination of both published work and workshop material, and finally, to inspire writers to create a variety of original pieces, working in different points of view and structures, some of which may exceed the boundaries of the writer’s comfort zone. In order to accomplish these goals, you, as the writer, must be willing to try different techniques and exercises, and you must be open to criticism from peers as well as your instructor. The more you are willing to challenge yourself as a writer (and risk failure), the more you will gain from this class. As Hemingway said, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.”

ENW 3500                             History of the English Language                             Monteverde

Recognizing that any description of this course is destined to be off-putting, let me begin by stating that ideally this course should make your own language come alive for you as a living entity whose current form is the result of all its childhood experiences and whose future shape though predictable to some extent is also yet to be determined.  We will study the growth of our language from its origin as a descendant of the Indo-European language family in distant prehistory to its current position as the 2nd most widely known language in the modern world. Topics covered will include the relationship between English and other languages, the evolution of modern English grammar, and the causes of the mess we call the English spelling system (if it can be called that).  Tests will be augmented with a variety of assignments, such as a personal language history, designed to help you appreciate the on-going and individual process of change that can be experienced in the study of English. An optional service learning unit can also be taken as part of the course.  This course is required for all students pursuing secondary education licensure in English and students pursing an English Language Learners certificate.  It is also beneficial for anyone (a group which should include all people studying English literature and/or writing) who want to develop a deeper awareness and understanding of our language.

ENG 3895                              Rhetoric of Country Music                                      Blomeley 

“Three chords and the truth.” According to songwriter Harlan Howard’s famous definition, that’s country music in a nutshell. In this course, we will put Howard’s definition to the test, focusing more on the “truth” than the chords. Using classical and contemporary rhetorical theory as a framework, we will investigate the rhetorical construction and performance of country music, looking specifically at the canons of Invention, Style, and Delivery. In so doing, we will place Dolly Parton alongside Plato, Alan Jackson alongside Aristotle, and Kitty Wells alongside Kenneth Burke, focusing all the while on country music as a uniquely American rhetoric.

As we listen to and read country music through the lens of rhetoric, we will use the following questions to guide our inquiry: How does rhetoric shape reality—and vice versa? What are the rhetorical conventions of country music? How might country music reveal American attitudes toward and anxieties about race, class, gender, region, religion, and sexuality? What voices and perspectives are recognized in country music?  What voices are left out? In other words: what does country music reveal about the culture in which it has thrived, and how can rhetoric help us make sense of it? Texts will include Reading Country Music: Steel Guitars, Opry Stars, and Honky Tonk Bars (ed. Tichi), Country Boys and Redneck Women: New Essays in Gender and Country Music (eds. Pecknold and McCusker), and the forthcoming Ken Burns documentary Country Music.

ENW 4895                             Advanced Studies in Rhetoric                                  Overall

The Rhetoric of War

In his landmark 1946 book The Grammar of Motives, Kenneth Burke, a major theorist in modern rhetoric, begins with the epigraph “ad bellum purificandum,” which is Latin for “toward the purification of war.” What follows is Burke’s earnest exploration of how to use language in such a way to prevent future world wars. Due to the experience of two world wars, many modern rhetorical theorists in the 20th century similarly wrestled with traditional ideas in their discipline in the wake of the recently-experienced propaganda and violence. This course focuses on a number of those theorists (Nietzsche, Burke, Richards, Weaver, Young, Becker, and Pike) to more clearly study, according to I.A. Richards, “misunderstanding and its remedies.” As a class, we will take as our objects of analysis propaganda war posters, political war deliberations, war documentaries, protest songs, as well as other artifacts to study what Burke calls “the human barnyard.” Course assignments will involve a number of reading responses, a short video assignment, and a final rhetorical analysis essay.

 

Time

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Time

Tuesday

Thursday

9

ENL 2330

ENL 2330

ENL 2330

9:30

ENG 1050

ENL 3895.01

ENW 2895

ENG 1050

ENL 3895.01

ENW 2895

11

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENW 2430.01

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENW 2430.01

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENW 2430.01

11

ENW 2430.03

ENL 3720

ENW 2430.03

ENL 3720

12

ENG 3000

ENG 1895

 

12:30

ENW 3895

ENL 2220

ENW 2100

ENW 3895

ENL 2220

ENW 2100

1

ENL 2110

ENW 3050

ENG 1050

ENL 2110

ENW 3050

ENG 1050

ENL 2110

ENW 3050

ENG 1050

2

ENG 1050

ENL 3895.02

ENW 2510

ENG 1050

ENL 3895.02

ENW 2510

2

ENW 2430.02

ENW 3410

ENW 2430.02

ENW 3410

ENW 2430.02

3:30

 

 

3:30

ENW 4895

ENW 4895

 

 

 

 

4

ENL/W 3500/ENG 5040

ENL/W 3500/ENG 5040

 

 

 

 

6

ENG 5810

 

 

6

ENG 5000

ENG 6100

 

ENL/W 3500 – History of the English Language (Monteverde)

ENL 3720 – Romanticism in England (Murray)

 

ENL 3895.01 – Shakespeare Stage & Screen (Yeo)

ENL 3895.02 – Diaspora (H. Finch)

 

ENW 2895 – Writers in Context (Stover)

ENW 3050 – Writing and Learning: Peer Tutor Seminar (Pinter)

ENW 3410 – Fiction (S. Finch)

ENW 3895.01 – Rhetoric of Country Music (Blomeley)

ENW 4895.01 – Rhetoric of War (Overall)

ENG 5000 – Practical Literary Criticism (Blomeley)

ENG 5040 – History of the English Language (Monteverde – cross-listed with 3500)

ENG 5810 – Brit Lit Readings (Monteverde)

ENG 6100 – Pulitzer Winners (Hobson)

 

 

Notes:

ENW 2895, Writers in Context, may be substituted for ENW 3020, Theories of Writing.

ENL 3895.02, African Diaspora, may be substituted for ENL 3800, World Literature.

ENG 6000 and ENG 6340 will be offered in the summer. ENG 6000, Brecht and Beckett, will also be offered as ENL 4895 for undergraduates who need an upper-division summer class. It meets on Tuesday evenings during both summer sessions.

 

 

Graduate Courses (ENG)
SUMMER 2019

ENG 6000                                          Brecht and Beckett                                       McDonough

This course is designed to give students an in-depth look at two of the 20th century’s most influential authors: the German playwright Bertolt Brecht and the Irish playwright Samuel Beckett. We will read several plays by each author, as well as examine certain important essays written by and/or about these authors so as to better understand their philosophy about the theater and about their art. We will also consider ways they have influenced other playwrights in order to better understand the impact both Brecht and Beckett have had and continue to have on other dramatists. Both Beckett and Brecht are informed by various philosophical and political theories—Beckett deeply steeped in existentialism and Brecht in the Marxist Dialectic. So, we will be incorporating reading from Brecht’s essays about the theater (gathered in the volume Brecht on Theatre) and also reading some key essays of existentialist thought as background.

Our longer summer class meetings will allow us not only to engage in deeper analysis of the plays we read, but also stage some scenes in class to consider how the scripts work in performance and view some scenes from previous productions. Thus we will also be discussing the semiotics of theater—how the various languages of the stage work. There is a visceral nature to theater—to the live performance of actors standing before an audience—that adds important layers of meaning to this art form, which we will be grappling with as we work through the scripts. A dramatist understands how to work in a three-dimensional medium and we will be looking at that aspect of the texts as we read. Both Brecht’s agit-prop political theater, and Beckett’s minimalist existential theater continue to influence playwrights, as well as authors in other genres today, so understanding how both of these playwrights manipulate the languages of the stage will be crucial to class discussion.

These two playwrights’ works should entertain us, challenge us, shake us up, and give us much to think about and discuss. Students should leave this class understanding a good deal about both of these playwrights, their cultural and artistic influence, and also about the art form of drama.

Likely reading list:

Brecht on Theatre (select essays)

Brecht’s plays: Mother Courage and her Children

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

Galileo

One of the following: Baal, A Man’s a Man, or The Threepenny Opera

Beckett’s plays: Waiting for Godot

Endgame,

Krapp’s Last Tape

A few of his shorter plays such as Not I, Happy Days, Footfalls

Most likely we will also look at Camus’ essay “The Myth of Sisyphus” and perhaps another existentialist essay. I will also direct you toward plays and/or playwrights who have been influenced by these playwrights, and we will either read one or more of these plays or view scenes from them in class, depending on availability and on time we have for covering this material.

ENG 6340                  Gender Studies: Women's Rhetoric                                    Blomeley

“She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.” -- Sen. Mitch McConnell

When, two years ago, Mitch McConnell censured his colleague Sen. Elizabeth Warren for attempting to read aloud the words of Coretta Scott King on the Senate floor, he was participating in a long and rich tradition: the silencing of women by patriarchal forces. Nevertheless, Elizabeth Warren, Coretta Scott King, and women throughout history have persisted in making their voices heard. In this course we will trace the history of that persistence from classical Greece to the present day, focusing particularly on the ways sex, gender, social class, and race intersect to shape women’s rhetoric. This course aims to expose students to the long history—global and local—of women’s writing and rhetorical practices. Assignments include a rhetorical analysis essay, an archival project, and a piece of public scholarship. Readings will come from a wide variety of writers and speakers from the past two millennia: from Aspasia to Amy Schumer, from Queen Elizabeth I to Toni Morrison, from Ida B. Wells to Malala Yousafzai, from Gloria Anzaldua to Lindy West.

Graduate Courses (ENG)
FALL 2019

ENG 5000                              Practical Literary Criticism                                     Blomeley

Theories and Methods in English Studies

How do we create knowledge in English Studies? The answers to that question, as you may imagine, vary wildly. For some, the answer lies in composing creative texts. For others, in applying critical theory to literary or rhetorical works. For still others, in conducting primary research in an archive, classroom, or community site. This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of approaches—both theoretical and methodological—to scholarly and creative work in English so that you may understand how to contribute to the discipline. Our work will be guided by three overarching goals: surveying the field, understanding critical theory, and applying foundational methods.

We will consider a variety of academic genres, such as the prospectus, the critical essay, the book review, the annotated bibliography, the conference paper, the thesis, and the scholarly article. Assignments will include weekly reading responses, short essays, and one conference-style paper and presentation at the end of the term.

ENG 5040                              History of the English Language                             Monteverde

Recognizing that any description of this course is destined to be off-putting, let me begin by stating that ideally this course should make your own language come alive for you as a living entity whose current form is the result of all its childhood experiences and whose future shape though predictable to some extent is also yet to be determined.  We will study the growth of our language from its origin as a descendant of the Indo-European language family in distant prehistory to its current position as the 2nd most widely known language in the modern world. Topics covered will include the relationship between English and other languages, the evolution of modern English grammar, and the causes of the mess we call the English spelling system (if it can be called that).  Tests will be augmented with a variety of assignments, such as a personal language history, designed to help you appreciate the on-going and individual process of change that can be experienced in the study of English. An optional service learning unit can also be taken as part of the course.  This course is required for all students pursuing secondary education licensure in English and students pursing an English Language Learners certificate.  It is also beneficial for anyone (a group which should include all people studying English literature and/or writing) who want to develop a deeper awareness and understanding of our language.

ENG 5810                              Readings in British Literature I                               Monteverde

At one time, no student of English literature would have been considered educated without having read, usually more than once, in detail, and perhaps even in the original form of our language, many of the works and authors that will form the backbone of this course: Beowulf; Chaucer; Langland; the Gawain Poet; Malory; Spenser and, of course, Shakespeare. Now this is the exception rather than the rule, as is even seen in the fact this is one of options you have for a readings course, rather than a requirement. To my way of thinking this is a terrible loss (and not just because this is the period of literature which I have chosen to study).  In fact, I chose to study this period because of this loss, because of my own realization during my Junior Year in England that although I had had an excellent literary education and considered myself to be pretty well-read, until I took a course focused almost entirely on Beowulf  I truly knew little about the literature of the Anglo-Saxon or Old English period, even though there is more surviving pre-1000 AD European literature composed in a version of English than there is from any other vernacular language than Latin or Greek.  How can we not take pride in this, not study this, most importantly not recognize that this (and the literature of the entire Middle Ages) is the foundation on which so much that followed was built?  This then is the primary purpose of this course, to help you acquire a knowledge (and I hope appreciation) of the literature and language and by extension culture and concerns of these early periods.

ENG 6100                                         Pulitzer Fiction                                  Hobson
(Please see the online course listing for a full description of this course.)