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Course Descriptions

Course Offerings

Department of English

Fall 2018

Note: ENG 1010 is a prerequisite for all of the following courses except ENG 1050.

English Classes (ENG)

ENG 1050                                             Understanding Literary Language                                            Trout

In this general education English course, students will focus on learning to read texts closely and critically. Students will read in a number of genres such as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the novel while developing the technical literary vocabulary required to write about them. Additionally, students will gain a heightened appreciation of connections, patterns, and themes. As the first of four core courses for undergraduate English majors, this course aims to begin students on a four-year (and ultimately lifelong) path to better, stronger, reading and writing skills. This semester we will be reading, among other texts, Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty Four and Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure.

ENG 1895                                             Introduction to English Studies                                                    Curtis

“English majors want the joy of seeing the world through the eyes of people who—let us admit it—are more sensitive, more articulate, shrewder, sharper, more alive than they themselves are….You see that life is bigger, sweeter, more tragic and intense—more alive with meaning than you had thought.”

                                                                                                                                                          ---Mark Edmundson

In this one credit-hour course, students will learn about the wide and varied field of English Studies, including Creative Writing, Writing and Rhetoric, and Literature, among others.  Faculty and alumni guest speakers will provide you with the ‘big picture’ about both academic study in English at Belmont and lots of first-hand information about the variety of professional opportunities for graduates. Whether you’re undecided about your major, a brand new English major or minor, or an established English major or minor trying to get more perspective on your chosen field, this course is for you.

ENG 2000                                             Critical Reading and Writing                                                       Sisson

This course is designed to introduce English majors and minors to the nature of critical theory and its applications. We will study a number of critical approaches that you will practice applying to several major literary works. This is both a reading- and writing-intensive course; there will be several papers to write, and we will read about the critical theories in some depth. This class also seeks to develop students’ oral communication skills by engaging in serious critical discussion. Please note that this course will not count for General Education Humanities credit.

ENG 3000                                             Junior Seminar in English                                                            Curtis

In ENG 3000, guest speakers and graduates of the program will help introduce you to a variety

of career paths. It’s a great place to be thinking about what kind(s) of internship you plan on

pursuing, as well as thinking about how to shape the remainder of your undergraduate experience

to best prepare for life after college. Requires the preparation of a professional resume, a LinkedIn page, and other professional development activities.

This is a graduation requirement that will only be offered in the Fall. If you are graduating in December 2018 or in May or August 2019 and have not yet taken ENG 3000, you need to be in this course this semester.                       

ENG 3960                                                             Internship                                                                           Overall

The purpose of the writing internship course is to provide practical application of classroom learning in an off-campus professional setting. Students enrolled in the course are in the process of performing the work of an internship designed and approved the prior semester in collaboration with Dr. Overall, the English Department’s Internship Coordinator. The number of hours you must complete in your work as an intern at your chosen workplace varies according to the number of credit hours for which you are enrolled: 3 hours Belmont course credit = 9 hours/week (approximately 108 hours total); 2 hours Belmont course credit = 6 hours/week (approximately 72 hours total); 1 hour Belmont course credit = 3 hours/week (approximately 36 hours). Class sessions are devoted to discussions of workplace writing issues and strategies. Students write reflections in which they describe their internship experiences; complete a series of short professional-writing “cases”; and compose and design a digital portfolio with documents they produce on the job. Half of the course grade will be determined from the above assignments while the internship supervisor evaluation will determine the other half. For more information, see http://www.joeloverall.com/courses/ENG3960/

ENG 4900                                             Senior Seminar in English                                                            Trout

“Soon now we shall go out of the house and go into the convulsion of the world, out of history into history and the awful responsibility of time.”  

                                                                                                                                                ---Robert Penn Warren

In Senior Seminar students will engage in a semester-long reflection on and discussion about their time at Belmont as an English major and look forward to their future endeavors after graduation. Specifically students will consider the following questions: where have you been? where are you now? where are you going? We will be revisiting old writing, writing reflectively about the experience as an English major, and writing analytically and creatively about John Steinbeck’s East of Eden and Lee Smith’s Fair and Tender Ladies. At the end of the course, students will produce an individually designed launch project tailored to their own future interests. Prerequisite: ENG 2000

Literature Classes (ENL)

ENL 2110                                                              British Literature I                                                           Murray

A survey of texts composed in England from ca. 800-1800:  works by anonymous Anglo-Saxon poets, Chaucer, Elizabeth I, Shakespeare, Lanyer, Mary Wroth, Sidney, Donne, Herbert, Herrick, Milton, Wycherley, Swift and Pope.  We will study epics and mock-epics, poems sacred and profane, prose deadly serious and wackily satirical.  We will study the visual, religious, political, economic and cultural backgrounds of these works.  We will consider how the first thousand years of British lit provides the basis for much of today's popular entertainment.  Although our focus will not be on linguistics, we will take note as language changes from Anglo Saxon to Middle English to Early Modern English.  Students will produce 4 short position papers, take three tests (one being the final exam), and write brief daily paragraphs.  Text:  The Broadview Anthology of English Literature, Concise Edition, Volume A.  ENL 2110 counts for English-major and minor survey requirements and for Gen. Ed. Humanities credit.

ENL 2310                                                         European Literature I                                                        McDonald

This course stretches from Creation (or at least as understood in Babylonian, Greek, and Hebrew cultures) to Don Quixote tilting at windmills.  In the course of this survey, we will read the epics, lyrics, dramas, romances, novels, essays, treatises, travel tales, short stories—the abundance of genres that still animate our world today.  Once upon a time, this course in particular was the dreaded “dead white males” course, but you will discover it is far from that.  Yes, we will read Homer, but also Sappho; Dante and also Christine de Pizan; Petrarch and Louise Labé.  The proliferation of genres in the European sphere over the years from about 1500 BCE to 1600 CE includes also a proliferation of voices and stories; these voices and stories create the traditions out of which British and American literature grow.  In addition to some wonderful reading, course members will write short critical analyses, complete class projects, and write a reflective final exam essay.  ENL 2310 counts for English-major and minor survey requirements and for Gen. Ed. Humanities credit

ENL 2220                                                      American Literature since 1865                                               Trout

American Literature II surveys the development of America’s literature and cultural identity from the Civil War to the present. We will read the works of authors that are most often placed into convenient “isms”—Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism. We will identify these movements in America’s literature and question the validity of these handy categories. The literature of this country will be addressed from a number of historical, social, and critical perspectives. This course will foster better critical reading, writing, and research skills and encourage thoughtful oral communication. American Literature before 1865 is not a pre-requisite. ENL 2220 counts for English-major and minor survey requirements and for Gen. Ed. Humanities credit.

ENL/W 3500                                       History of the English Language                                                           Monteverde

Recognizing that any description of this course is destined to be off-putting, let me begin by stating that ideally this course should make your own language come alive for you as a living entity whose current form is the result of all its childhood experiences and whose future shape though predictable to some extent is also yet to be determined. We will study the growth of our language from its origin as a descendant of the Indo-European language family in distant prehistory to its current position as the 2nd most widely known language in the modern world. Topics covered will include the relationship between English and other languages, the evolution of modern English grammar, and the causes of the mess we call the English spelling system (if it can be called that). Tests will be augmented with a variety of assignments, such as a personal language history, designed to help you appreciate the on-going and individual process of change that can be experienced in the study of English. An optional service learning unit can also be taken as part of the course. This course is required for all students pursuing secondary education licensure in English and students pursing an English Language Learners certificate; it is also highly recommended (and really should be required) for all students combining an English major with elementary certification or pursuing a minor or second major in foreign language

ENL 3895                         Medieval Literature: Peoples of Ragnarok                                                               Monteverde

 “What is to be said about Ragnarok?” Though this inquiry comes from an account of Northern mythology written almost 800 years ago, I suspect such a question has been echoed by many in the last few years, as such works as A.S. Byatt’s Ragnarok, Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology, and most recently the Marvel film Thor Ragnarok have brought this once obscure Viking term into the public consciousness.

But why? What is to be said of Ragnarok and why are we fascinated by the story today?  In this class we will explore not only the original stories from which our modern retellings arise but other pieces of literature produced by what I am terming “peoples of Ragnarok,” that is, the Scandinavians, the Germans, and the English. Though stories of Ragnarok do not come down to us from all of these cultures, their literature is often grounded in a mindset accepting of a fated future of destruction, presaged by a world equally of violence and nobility. We will conclude the course by looking at several recent reworkings of this story to explore ways in which we too as their descendants are also a people of Ragnarok. The reading list for this course will include both ancient texts as well as contemporary works by A.S. Byatt, Neil Gaiman, and others.

ENL 3895              True Stories Told Well: American Non-Fiction Post World War II                                                 Hobson 

Since World War II non-fiction has matched, or surpassed, other genres in American literature in scope and sales. Starting with the genre-shaping work of Joseph Mitchell (1940s-50s) and Gay Talese (1960s-70s), we will meet/read writers whose non-fiction puts them inside the pantheon of great American writers.

ENL 4360                                    The Weird World of Edgar Allan Poe                                                                 Curtis

                                There comes Poe, with his raven, like Barnaby Rudge,

                                Three fifths of him genius and two fifths sheer fudge…

                                Who has written some things quite the best of their kind

                                But the heart somehow seems all squeezed out by the mind.

In this literary seminar, we’re going to be assessing James Russell Lowell’s mid-nineteenth century claims by reading deeply—and nearly completely—the oeuvre of Edgar Allan Poe: his poetry, his short stories (including sketches, horror fiction, detective stories, and hoaxes), his literary criticism, his essays, and his novel. We’ll also sample Poe’s critics and biographers, from Lowell to the 21st century. We’ll be evaluating Poe in the context of U.S. literary and cultural trends of the early-to-mid-nineteenth century, as well as assessing his short- and longer-term influence on other writers, readers, and wide variety of artists.

ENL 4370              Advanced Studies in World Literature - Fictions of Empire                                       Gustke

One of the past century’s most profound transformations was decolonization: the end of direct European rule over vast areas of the planet. With the aim of combatting the continued domination of imperialism, novelists, cultural theorists, and social analysts have contributed and responded to this shift, producing a dynamic body of texts we term postcolonial. Focusing on the intersection of transnational theory and literature, this course seeks to interrogate important issues related to the construction of nation and national literature, alongside the disenfranchised formation of colonial and diasporic identities. One of our key objectives will be to examine the challenging rhetoric of postcolonial terms such as discursivity, hegemony, subalternity, mimicry, hybridity, and global imperialism as they function to both limit and expand the history and geography of the literary paradigms of postcolonial studies. By the end of the course you will have an understanding of the complexities of the postcolonial situation and will be able to apply postcolonial theory to a broad range of discursive practices as they exist in both the works we read and the lives we lead. Texts will include Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks, Homi K. Bhabha’s The Location of Culture, Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, J.M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of the Yellow Sun.

Note: ENL 4370 can be substituted for ENL 3800 - Special Topics in World Literature.

Writing Classes (ENW)

ENW 2100                                                           Digital Literacies                                                              Overall

In this course, students will work to cultivate digital literacies. In order to do so, students will critically analyze and compose within a variety of multimedia genres such as web texts, video, image creation, and digital archives. In addition to learning industry-standard publication and design software such as iMovie, Adobe Creative Cloud, and HTML/CSS coding, students will work with many modes (words, image, sound, hypertext, arrangement) of texts and will produce a variety of products that involve many different media while exploring some of the most recent theories regarding the challenges to authorship these types of products invoke. For our final project, this semester’s class will be involved in creating and presenting the Nashville Shakespeare Performance Archive in coordination with materials collected by Dr. McDonald’s class from the fall semester. This project is made possible by a grant from the Folger Shakespeare Library and will be an actual website hosted by the Bunch Library at Belmont University. No prior experience with technology or Shakespeare is required

ENW 2430                                           Introduction to Creative Writing                                                      Finch

The goal of this class is for students to come away with an understanding of genre expectations for both poetry and fiction. For poetry, we will examine the writer’s attention to language, tone, line breaks, etc., and for fiction, we will focus on using specific concrete details while avoiding cliché, creating characters and scenes, and understanding how to tag dialogue. In this class, you can expect to be introduced to some of the aspects of the creative writing process that you might not be familiar with (such as workshop and revision). Finally, we will also read and discuss a number of different styles and voices in both fiction and poetry.

In Making Shapely Fiction, Jerome Stern describes a creative writing workshop as a place where “you are learning to articulate your reactions to a story…And you are teaching yourself to look at your own work with the same critical eye.” A story or a poem can benefit from guidance, but it needs to be the right kind. The ability to critique is not an innate skill, and instead, you must learn how to analyze a story through practice and instruction. Perhaps more importantly, you must also train yourself to be open to new ideas, to new ways of writing, new ways of reading, and even new ways of creating. As Albert Einstein said, “The mind that opens to a new idea never returns to its original size.” With this new set of skills, you will be ready to embark on further writing away from class with a basic foundation in how not just to write but how to be a writer.

ENW 2895            Introduction to Rhetoric: Words, Signs, and their Persuasions                            Lovvorn

How do you win an argument? Or persuade someone to do what you would like? The answers lie in the art of rhetoric, and this class introduces students to the history, theory, and range of rhetorical studies.

As Aristotle put it, “Rhetoric may be defined as the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion. This is not a function of any other art." With persuasion as a focus, the class encourages students to broaden their artistic skills as rhetorical analysts and as writers and composers. The class also asks students to consider how persuasion might best serve audiences when it is considerate and responsible rather than superficial and deceptive.

Students will encounter Aristotle’s thinking as well as other traditional ideas regarding the rhetorical arts, and the class will involve using these foundations to understand the persuasions embedded in modern communications—surveying landmark speeches, political tracts, media/marketing tactics, and even everyday symbols.

ENW 3050                          Writing and Learning, the Peer Tutoring Seminar                                           Pinter

In this course we will unpack all these complications by reading theories, stories, and practical advice from experienced tutors and scholars of writing. As we read and discuss theory, you will also engage in tutoring your peers both in the First-Year Seminar and in the Writing Center. Finally, you will write extensively to keep in touch with your own writing processes as you help other writers with theirs. We will share our work in the classroom, gaining even more experience in tutoring by providing feedback, guidance, and support to a First-Year Seminar class.  We will discuss which tutoring strategies work—and which don’t.   Recommendation by a Belmont professor and a complete application is required. 

For more information and the application, click here: english/Writing Fellow App 2018.pdf l or contact Dr. Pinter.  Both the complete application and recommendation are due by March 19 to robbie.pinter@belmont.edu. Decisions will be made by March 23.
   

ENW 3410                                        Creative Writing: Fiction                                                               Finch

In his book, Making Shapely Fiction, Jerome Stern describes a creative writing workshop as a place where “you are learning to articulate your reactions to a story…[while] teaching yourself to look at your own work with the same critical eye.” The ability to critique is not an innate skill, and instead, writers must learn how to analyze a story through practice and instruction. This course strives to accomplish three primary goals: to expose writers to a variety of styles, story shapes, and authors; to encourage the critical examination of both published work and workshop material; and finally, to inspire writers to create a variety of original pieces, working in different points of view and structures, some of which may exceed the boundaries of the writer’s comfort zone. In order to accomplish these goals, you, as the writer, must be willing to try different techniques and exercises, and you must be open to criticism from peers as well as your instructor. The more you are willing to challenge yourself as a writer (and risk failure), the more you will gain from this class. As Hemingway said, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.”

ENW 3580                                           Writing in the Community                                                         Hamilton

"Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope."                                                                                                                                                             --Maya Angelou

Writing in the Community is a workshop-based writing course where students will “jump hurdles, leap fences, and penetrate walls” in order to explore a range of communities and their place within them—from their individual communities to local communities in Nashville like Magdalene House and Morningside at Belmont, as well as global communities like the Eating Disorder International Coalition and the International Center for Empowerment. We will also study place and displacement within community through a range of lenses: memoirs and other forms of life writing, psychological analysis, as well as through their own and their community partner’s writing processes. In addition, students will learn how to analyze and enhance their own, their peers’, and professional writing to learn more about writing conventions, research options, stylistic alternatives, and audience expectations in community-based writing programs.

ENW 3670                                                Perspectives of Literacy                                                           Lovvorn

Over time, literacy has been seen from a variety of perspectives: as salvation, as obligation, and as a civil right. This course will consider individual acts of reading and writing and the connections of those acts to larger social, historical, political, economic, and material systems.

What does it mean to be literate?

Well, it depends on whom you ask. When most people think of “literacy,” their thoughts turn immediately to reading ability. However, the interdisciplinary work of literacy studies encompasses much more than decoding text on a page or screen. Additionally, college students often take their literacies for granted as they read, write, and create meaning across diverse settings without fully considering the historical, social, material, and political elements of these acts.

This course addresses these gaps by examining literacy from a variety of angles, including historical contexts, social models, and digital settings. Students will examine literacy’s centrality to thinking, to identity, and to social place as they complete assignments in print-based genres as well as in digital media. Class readings will range from historical accounts like Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass to theoretical takes like James Gee’s What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy

The class will especially benefit either English majors/minors who want to consider reader/writer identities more deeply or students in education studies who need a nuanced understanding of literacy and its significance.

Graduate Course Descriptions
Summer 2018

ENG 5820                                             Readings in British Literature II                                                       Schneller
Thursday 6-9:30 p.m.

The theme of British Literature II is shaping the taste of the early modern reader- stories, styles, and writers.  The main text for the course is The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Vol. 3, 2nd edition, The Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Published in 2012, this second edition is available widely used and is also an ebook. In addition to the Anthology, we will also study Shakespeare’s A Winter’s Tale and Coriolanus; novels by Burney,  Evelina, Godwin, Caleb Williams, and Mc Kenzie, A Man of Feeling; and prose letters and treatises by Collier, The art of ingeniously tormenting; Montagu, The Turkish Embassy Letters, The Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, African, and Helena Maria Williams’ Letters written in France. All of these are available in used editions as well.

The texts we study have been chosen to reflect the literary traditions they embody,  as well as their influence on 19th century writers.  The period of study for this course, which encompasses essentially two centuries, documents the rise of the professional author, literary entrepreneurship, the solidification of copyrights for creative works, the birth of the modern political treatise, the rise of modern novel, the formation of national voices in literary writing, and initial forays by male and female writers into literary theory and the strategic deployment of  book publishing to shape consumers’ taste in new literatures published between 1603 and 1804. 

ENG 6400             Special Topics in Literature: Psychoanalysis on Stage (20-21st century)                      Curtis
Course will meet primarily on Blackboard

This course will constitute a survey of U.S. Drama since 1916 viewed through the lens of psychoanalytic literary criticism. Through readings, discussions, writing assignments, and other experiences, we’ll develop a good working knowledge of both psychoanalytic criticism and drama as literature and in performance. Authors will likely include Susan Glaspell, Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, Leroi Jones, Lorraine Hansberry, Marsha Norman, Tony Kushner, Paula Vogel, David Auburn, and Suzan-Lori Parks.

This class is cross listed with ENL 4380, Advanced Studies in Genre.

Fall 2018 

ENG 5000                                                            Practical Literary Criticism                                                      Yeo
Tuesday. 6-8:30

This course will awaken you to the different interpretive strategies that critics have used to read literary and filmic texts over the past century. In doing so, it will help you understand the aesthetic, linguistic, and political implications of writing. Ultimately, through gaining familiarity with the questions and controversies that drive how we understand literature, you will become more incisive readers, writers, and thinkers.

We will cover one school of criticism each week, with sample readings from the philosophers, historians, political writers, and authors who have contributed to our understanding of literature. In addition, we will read 2-3 longer literary works (novels, plays), as well as poems, short stories, and short-form films that will serve as the basis for our analysis throughout the term. Assignments will include weekly reading responses, two short essays, and one conference-style paper and presentation at the end of the term.

ENG 5040                                             History of the English Language                                                   Monteverde
Mon/Wed 4-5:15 p.m.

Recognizing that any description of this course is destined to be off-putting, let me begin by stating that ideally this course should make your own language come alive for you as a living entity whose current form is the result of all its childhood experiences and whose future shape though predictable to some extent is also yet to be determined.  We will study the growth of our language from its origin as a descendant of the Indo-European language family in distant prehistory to its current position as the 2nd most widely known language in the modern world. Topics covered will include the relationship between English and other languages, the evolution of modern English grammar, and the causes of the mess we call the English spelling system (if it can be called that).  Tests will be augmented with a variety of assignments, such as a personal language history, designed to help you appreciate the on-going and individual process of change that can be experienced in the study of English. An optional service learning unit can also be taken as part of the course.  This course is required for all students pursuing secondary education licensure in English and students pursing an English Language Learners certificate.  It is also beneficial for anyone (a group which should include all people studying English literature and/or writing) who want to develop a deeper awareness and understanding of our language.

ENG 6300                                             Prose Style: The Music of Writing                                                   Stover                   
Monday 6-8:30 p.m.  

Virginia Woolf once claimed that “style is a very simple matter; it is all rhythm. Once you get that, you can't use the wrong words.” She goes on to say, “Now this is very profound, what rhythm is, and goes far deeper than any words. A sight, an emotion, creates this wave in the mind, long before it makes words to fit it.” This course will investigate Woolf’s claim by examining rhythmic structures of sentences that create distinctive prose styles. We will focus our study not only on what sentences say, but also on how they work, and on how the rhythm and music of a sentence goes straight to the heart of meaning.  As writers, we will analyze the rhythmic structures of some of our most poetic prose stylists, but mostly we will practice using rhythmic structures in our own poetic prose pieces. Using Virginia Tufte’s Artful Sentences: Syntax as Style, Ellen Voigt’s The Art of Syntax: Rhythm of Thought, Rhythm of Song, and Francis Christensen’s “A Generative Rhetoric of the Sentence,” we will analyze and experiment with syntax and rhythm in flash nonfiction, essays, children’s books, and selections from novels, memoirs, and the Bible. We will also practice reading aloud, engaging in prose reading performances that allow us to hear the rhythm of prose. Rather than one extended paper, students will be expected to write every week, both in and outside of class. All the writing will be revised and collected in a portfolio with an introductory essay in which students discuss their own progress in developing a prose style as well as their process of revision throughout the course of the semester.

ENG 6400                            Special Topics in World Literature: Fictions of Empire                                  Gustke
Thursday. 6-8:30 p.m.

One of the past century’s most profound transformation was decolonization: the end of direct European rule over vast areas of the planet. Novelists, cultural theorists, and social analysts have contributed and responded to this shift, producing a dynamic body of texts we term postcolonial, with the aim of combatting the continued domination of imperialism. Focusing on the intersection of transnational theory and literature, this course seeks to interrogate important issues related to the construction of nation and national literature, alongside the disenfranchised formation of colonial and diasporic identities. One of our key objectives will be to examine the problematic rhetoric of postcolonial terms such as discursivity, hegemony, subalternity, mimicry, hybridity, and global imperialism as they function to both limit and expand the history and geography of the literary paradigms of postcolonial studies. As graduate students in this course, you will be asked to critically investigate the theoretical issues, cultural specificities, and epistemological conditions of the imperialist system shaping the works we read. By the end of the course you will have an understanding of the complexities of the postcolonial situation and will be able to apply postcolonial theory to a broad range of discursive practices as they exist in the texts we read and the lives we lead.

This class is cross-listed with ENL 4370, Advanced Studies in World Literature.

Humanities Courses (HUM)
Fall 2018


HUM 1895                                                         Entertaining Lives                                                              Schneller

Entertaining Lives is the study of autobiographical and biographical writing by and about recognized personalities in the entertainment industry, broadly defined and inclusive of dance, art, music, television, journalism, film, etc. As a readings course, the figures studied may change, but the content is focused on how the lives are written and what the lives tell us about the reputation of the artists, allowing for the study of the cultural, historical, political, and artistic interpretations of the individual lives.

HUM 2895                                           The Gothic and its Long Dark Shadow                                               Murray

This course, intended for the General Education student, will examine the history and diversity of the Gothic.   We begin, as did the Gothic, during the 18th Century:  the rest of the semester will visit 19th, 20thand 21st-century reworkings and developments of Gothic themes and techniques.  We will list and define critical terms essential for understanding the Gothic (Edmund Burke's "sublime," Freud's "uncanny" and "melancholy," Bakhtin's "carnival," Kristeva's "abjection," Kosofsky Sedgwick's "homosocial desire," "femme fatale" etc).  We will glance at manifestations of the Gothic in architecture, fashion, design and art (Horace Walpole's estate at Strawberry Hill, Giovanni Piranesi’s "carceri", Giles Scott’s St. Pancras Station and Barry’s Houses of Parliament—and, of course, art by Caspar David Friedrich, John Atkinson Grimshaw, Gustave Moreau, and Edward Gorey).  We will glance at a few gothic poems:  Keats' "La Belle Dame Sans Merci"; and Goethe's "Der Erlkönig" (set to music by Franz Schubert).  We will focus on varieties of Gothic fiction:  the domestic gothic, the female gothic, the Queer gothic, the political gothic, the Irish and Scottish gothic, the sexual gothic, the postcolonial gothic,

and the romantic gothic.  Readings:  Ann Radclife, Sicilian Romance; M. G. Lewis, The Monk; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Bram Stoker, Dracula; Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca; Stephen King, The Shining; Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey and "The Demon Lover" by Elizabeth Bowen.  Film:  Jordan Peele's Get Out (2017).  Since the reading will be voluminous (ca. 2400 pp.), you will want to get started early (don't start with Radcliffe). 

 

Time

Monday

Wednesday

Friday

Time

Tuesday

Thursday

9

ENW 2430

ENL 2110

ENL 4360

ENW 2430

ENL 2110

ENL 4360

ENW 2430

ENL 2110

ENL 4360

9:30

ENG 1050

ENL 3895.01

ENW 2895

ENG 1050

ENL 3895.01

ENW 2895

11

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENW 2430

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENW 2430

ENG 2000

ENG 4900

ENW 2430

11

ENL 3895.02

ENL 3895.02

12

ENG 1000

ENG 3000

 

12:30

ENW 3670

ENG 1050

ENW 3670

ENG 1050

1

ENL 2220

ENW 2430

ENW 3050

ENL 2220

ENW 2430

ENW 3050

ENL 2220

ENW 2430

ENW 3050

2

ENW 3580

ENL 2310

ENW 3580

ENL 2310

2

ENW 3410

ENW 2510

ENW 3410

ENW 2510

 

3:30

 

 

3:30

ENW 2100

ENW 2100

 

 

 

 

4

ENL/W 3500/ENG 5040

ENL/W 3500/ENG5040

 

 

 

 

6

ENG 6300

 

 

6

ENG 5000

ENL 4370/ENG 6400

 

ENL 3895.01 – American Nonfiction after 1945 (Hobson)

ENL 3895.02 – Medieval Lit - Peoples of Ragnarok (Monteverde)

ENL 4360 – Poe single-author course (Curtis)

ENL 4370 – Fictions of Empire (Gustke)*

ENW 2895 – Intro to Rhetoric (Lovvorn)

ENW 3050 – Writing and Learning: Peer Tutor Seminar (Pinter)

ENW 3410 – Fiction (S. Finch)

ENW 3580 – Writing in the Community (Hamilton)

ENW 3670 – Perspectives of Literacy (Lovvorn)

ENG 5000 – Practical Literary Criticism (Yeo)

ENG 5040 – History of the English Language (Monteverde – cross-listed with 3500)

ENG 6300 – Prose Style (Stover)

ENG 6400 – Special Topics in Lit (Gustke – cross-listed with 4370)

 

*may be substituted for ENL 3800
No standard meeting times for ENW 4010 or ENG 3960