Graduate Catalog 2010


Curriculum Features of the Graduate Degree Programs of The Jack C. Massey Graduate School of Business

The curriculum of The Massey School graduate degree programs is designed to afford a strong, broad managerial base for graduates. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, individual and team projects, written reports, oral presentations, and interactive computer simulations. The Massey School faculty and its Board of Advisors believe today's business situations are complex and call for a variety of approaches to solving problems.

Throughout the graduate programs, emphasis is placed on basic oral and written communication skills, analytical skills, and ethical business issues. In addition, there is special emphasis on computer use. All students should own or have access to a computer with word processing and spreadsheet capabilities. Students are expected to have working knowledge of Microsoft Office products.

Both M.B.A. and M.ACC. students learn from faculty members who have significant business experience as well as strong academic credentials. Students also learn from fellow classmates who represent many job types and diverse industries. Employment backgrounds range from traditional business fields to health care, engineering, education and the nonprofit arena.

Provided below are details of the course requirements and schedule of classes for the graduate programs. The Massey School reserves the right to alter the curriculum, schedule, and sequence of courses. For current details, contact The Massey School office.

Schedule of Classes

The Massey School operates on a semester system with parts of terms within the fall and spring semesters. Students attend classes year-round with a short break between each session. Classes are held Monday through Thursday evenings and occasionally on Saturdays. Two-credit-hour classes meet either one evening a week for 10 weeks or two evenings a week for five weeks from 6:15 until 9:00 p.m.

Core courses usually are offered at least two times per academic year, with most elective courses offered once each academic year.


Back to Top