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September


4
Shane Claiborne: Ordinary Radicals
10am, Massey Performing Arts Center
Shane has spent time on the streets of Cacutta working with Mother Teresa and on the staff of a Chicago mega-church.  He helped found The Simple Way, a christian community in inner city Philadelphia that has sprawned numerous ministries and an international movement called The New Monasticism.  His books include Ordinary Radicals, Jesus for President, and Irresistible Revolution.
*Sponsored by University Ministries and the School of Religion

9 & 11
Donald Miller
Sept 9 I MPAC I 10am
Sept 11 I MPAC I 10am
Sept 11 I Neely Hall I 7:30pm
Donald Miller is the founder of Storyline, an organization that helps people plan their lives using the elements of story.  He is the author of multiple New York Times bestsellers including Blue Like Jazz and A Million Miles in a Thousand Years.  He is also the founder of The Mentoring Project, a non-profit helping to provide mentors for fatherless children.  Don currently lives and works in Washington, D.C. 
*Sponsored by University Ministries and Growth & Purpose for Students

13
Andrew White: Vicar of Baghdad
10am, Neely Hall
Rev. Dr. Andrew White is the Chaplain of St. George's Anglican Church in Bagdad, Iraq.  Over 6,000 people, including 600 Muslims, are connected to the church, which is the largest in Iraq and operates a medical clinic and food program.  Andrew studied at both Cambridge University and Hebrew University in Jerusalem.  He served as the Archbishop of Canterbury's Special Envoy to the Middle East, is the author of seven books, and has won the Three Faith's Forum Prize for Inter-Faith Relations and the International Council of Christians and Jews Prize for Intellectual Contribution to Jewish-Christian Relations.
*Sponsored by University Ministries and the College of Arts and Sciences

16
Jeffrey Dippmann: Innate Nature & Human Rights
10am, Massey Business Center
The international debate over human rights has neglected to take into account the major indigenous Chinese tradition, Daoism, which offers a valuable alternative to other socio-political models.  In this talk, Jeffrey Dippman of Central Washington University and President of the Association of Regional Centers for Asian Studies makes use of Daoist writings to provide a description of that traditions emphasis on individual rights rooted in a theory of human nature, as well as concrete examples of Daoism's advocacy for universal human rights from communal and cosmic perspectives.  *Sponsored by Asian Studies.

16
David Meador: Broken Eyes, Unbroken Spirit - Belmont & Beyond
10am, Neely Hall
David meador is a speaker, author, and champion golfer.  David lost his eyesight in an automobile accident during his freshman year of college.  He went on to earn his undergraduate degree at Southern Illinois University and his master's degree at Loyola University of Chicago.  David is a master in concentration and focus.  He's a champion blind golfer, but the lessons he teaches are not about golf, but finding new ways of seeing and thinking.  He's the author of Broken Eyes, Unbroken Spirit.  *Sponsored by Career Services for Belmont & Beyond.

18
Nicole Baker Fulgham: Teach for America
10am, Neely Hall
Nicole Baker Fulgham is the founder and president of The Expectations Project, which trains faith-motivated advocates to help close the achievement gap in public schools.  Dr. Fulgham's academic work focuses on urban education policy and teacher preparation.  She taught for Teach for America and advanced to become Vice President of Teacher Training.  She is the author of a new book, Educating All God's Children: What Christians Can Do to Help Improve Low-Income Public Schools for Kids.
*Sponsored by University Ministries and the Social Entrepreneurship Program

20
McCrary Sisters: One Journey
10am, Neely Hall
The McCrary sisters have spent a lifetime in the world of Americana and gospel music, recording with Stevie Wonder, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Elvis, and Patty Griffin and performing with the BC&M (Baptist, Catholic, & Methodist) Mass Choir.  The latest album is All the Way.
*Sponsored by University Ministries and the Curb College of Entertainment & Music Business

23
David Julselth - Saffron and Sardines: Encountering Otherness Through Culinary Adventures Here & Abroad
10am, Beaman A&B
The table is set and a bountiful banquet of thought-provoking sessions is prepared for the Humanities Symposium! Dr. David C. Julseth, chair of the Department of Foreign Languages at Belmont University, begins our discussion of "Encountering Otherness" with his research into the connections between culture and cuisine. At a basic level, food brings us together for sustenance yet it also separates us along social and cultural lines. Dr. Julseth will discuss authors who incorporate food revealing the world in which their characters live. In addition, he will share his experiences learning to cook in order to interact with others, have a hands-on cultural experience, and gain related knowledge and skills. Opening presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

23
David Curtis: Identity, Empathy, and Franklin's "Others"
11am Beaman A&B
Scholars of Benjamin Franklin have placed his writings in a number of rhetorical and literary contexts, but in part because of the difficulty of assigning motives to someone whose identity was so consciously public, very little has been written about how his propensity for inhabiting multiple, masked personae may have affected his empathetic response to those of other races, ethnicities, or genders. Dr. David Curtis's talk aims to answer a couple of questions: Did Benjamin Franklin learn anything by thus looking through the eyes of others? How did inhabiting characters like Silence Dogood or Polly Baker make him more empathetic to the concerns of others (if at all) during his nearly 70-year writing career? A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

23
Caresse John - "A Person in History": Feminist Standpoint Theory & Literature
1pm, Beaman A&B
In Margaret Atwood’s dystopia *The Handmaid’s Tale*, Offred tells us “context is all.” Literature, no matter what kind, is intimately connected to the human experience; indeed, written art is always a product directly associated with how the artist experiences life. As a theorist, Dr. Caresse John says, she is always searching for theories which connect, rather than separate, our language and our social world with our construction of knowledge. Standpoint theory, originally developed in the social sciences, is a theory that can be beneficially applied to the study of literature. This talk explores the advantages of applying feminist standpoint theory to literature, particularly *Passing* by Nella Larsen, and shows how literature – perhaps more than any other art form – has the power to make us know and learn from one another, despite our differences. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

23
Sue Trout - "Jesus will make you Itch": Encountering Other in Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible
2pm, Beaman A&B
Barbara Kingsolver’s *The Poisonwood Bible* follows one family’s mission to bring order and the message of Christ to the Belgian Congo of the 60’s. This religious mission, however, cannot be separated from the political turmoil that occurred during the last months of colonial rule over the Congo. This talk will examine the complexities of encountering “other” from a position of cultural assumption, misunderstanding, and power. Professor Sue Trout will look at what happens when religion and politics combine to produce a monolithic view of Western culture as superior and one that often allows people in positions of power to justify imposing dominion over those we assume want and need help. With humor and great compassion, Kingsolver suggests that even well intentioned Christianity and Nationalism are paradoxical in nature--when “other” translates to “lesser,” the treatment of other reflects hypocrisy and arrogance and creates a breeding ground for violence. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

23
Gary McDowell: The Ethics of Creative Nonfiction...Are There Any?
3:30pm, Beaman A&B
“Write two paragraphs about the kitchen in the house you grew up in.” This is a common prompt for a class in creative nonfiction. We might start with the table and the chairs, the cabinets and the oven, the placemats and the lighting. And then, Mom walks in. Or Grandma. Or Dad. And everything changes. What were they wearing? What did their facial expressions mean? Did they have glasses in 1975? The question emerges: how much do we owe to the truth, our memories, and the likely convergence of the two? What are our responsibilities when we draw on experiences that involve the experiences of others? A panel of students, led by English professor Dr. Gary L. McDowell, will discuss the ethics of writing the “creative truth.” A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

23
Tam Mai's Art Show and Reception: Meet the Artist
5pm, Leu Art Gallery (Library)
Please join us for the opening of an installation of paintings by Tam Mai, longtime Belmont University staff member. Tam’s beautiful paintings capture the sights and the experiences of his native Vietnam and depict his observations of Belmont University. A Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

23
Whispering to Fool the Wind: A Poetry Reading by Eduardo C. Corral
7pm, Beaman A&B
Only a few Chicano/a poets are regularly anthologized. Unfortunately, the work chosen, though beautifully written and culture-specific, is English-dominant and largely mirrors that of the Western canon. These poems educate the reader, but they don't code-switch -- a shuttling between various languages and various literary traditions. In his first book, *Slow Lightning*, Eduardo C. Corral braids English and Spanish, flaunts the influence of Robert Hayden, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Bei Dao. During his reading, Corral will discuss how growing up bilingual and caught between two cultures prepared him to be a writer open to various linguistic approaches. A Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

24
Panel: Who am I in the Service Learning Classroom?  Student Connection and Perspective Transformation
10am, Beaman A&B
Service learning enables student learning in many ways, but one of the most powerful involves what scholars call “perspective transformation”—the shift in viewpoint that accompanies work with different populations. This panel, consisting of four service-learning professors, will talk about designing classes with this identity shift in mind. Drawing on examples from past service-learning classes, the panel will also consider the educational advantages of seeing the world through different eyes. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.
 
24
Panel: Teaching Otherness in the Classroom
11am, Beaman A&B
What does it mean to teach otherness? How do students benefit from grappling with worldviews distinct from their own? In what ways do diverse perspectives contribute to classroom learning? This panel, comprised of Belmont professors who prioritize otherness in their course design, will examine these questions and more. Panel members will draw upon their teaching philosophies and experiences to show how alternate perspectives can contribute to classroom practice. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

24
Kimberly Balding - Shamrocks, Shillelaghs, and Seanchais: Encountering Otherness in Ireland
2pm, Beaman A&B
Kimberly Balding has been exploring the idea of "others" through Ireland's myths, legends, histories, and stories for many years. However, it was her first trip to Northern Ireland to collect stories from women growing up during the Troubles that the idea of “others” came full circle. So, who are the “others” and what is this idea of “otherness” as it relates to the Irish culture? While not presuming to answer such a question in its fullness, Balding will discuss writers (W. B. Yeats, Bernard MacLaverty, Keith Donohue, Edna O’Brien, Nan Joyce, and others) who have guided her discovery of the history and stories of the Irish culture, her own experiences while traveling both in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, and the experiences of “others” who have opened the door of understanding for those living in a community steeped in both the physical aspects of “others,” as well as the emotional and spiritual elements of such an environment. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

24
Panel:  Abrazo Cultural Embrace: Who is My Nashville Neighbor?
3pm, Beaman A&B
During Maymester 2013, Belmont students participated in an experiential learning course taught by Dr. Mitch McCoy entitled “Abrazo Cultural Embrace.” With the objective of learning what it means to be an immigrant in Nashville, students read articles, wrote reflective journals and volunteered with local non-profits that serve the city’s growing Latino communities. In this session, several students will join Dr. McCoy to share about how the course’s mixture of classroom reading, volunteering, field trips and invited guest speakers introduced them to Nashville neighbors they might not normally have met and furthered their understanding of how to serve those international neighbors who now call Nashville home. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

24
Kevin Leander - Net-Working Opportunities to Learn and to Become: Examining How Immigrant Youth in the Netherlands Use New Media in the Production of Social Space
6pm, Beaman A&B
In this talk, Dr. Kevin Leander (Peabody College/Vanderbilt University) examines the social networks of second-generation immigrant youth (primarily Moroccan and Turkish) in The Netherlands as these networks are transformed by social media practices. Conceiving of social networks as spatial formations that extend across online and offline contacts, Leander considers how immigrant urban youth are spatially constrained and yet agentive and responsive in producing spaces for learning and identity. Drawing on social network analysis, Leander analyzes how relationships are organized, who functions as central figures or “nodes” within them, and how such networks traverse geographical boundaries such as school, community, city, and nation. Examining how immigrant youth marshal, use, create, and hybridize specific media resources allows us to understand how identity work produces individuals, while simultaneously (re)producing collective resources for identity work. A Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

25
Humanities Symposium Featured Speakers Panel
10am, Beaman, A&B
Please join the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium's featured speakers (Dr. Amy Shuman, Ms. CeCe Big Crow, Dr. George Yancy, Dr. Robert Barsky, & Mr. Eduardo Corral) as they share ideas and participate in a dialogue on the Symposium’s theme, "Encountering Otherness."

25
Manuel Cruz - Welcome the Other!  Hospitality, Violence, and the Formation of Conscience
11am, Beaman A&B
From tearful stories of Palestinian women to the blood-stained steps of a Romanian cathedral, we delve into the spiritual and existential wisdom of hospitality – welcoming the other (and the reality of violence) into our homes and neighborhoods. Drawing on personal stories, biblical wisdom, and post-modern philosophies of otherness, Dr. Manuel Cruz (School of Religion, Belmont University) explores how the experience and practice of hospitality contributes to the formation of conscience, the meaning of the good life, and the messianic peace of God in the midst of suffering and violence. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

25
Melanie Walton - From Automatons to Doppelgangers: A Spectrum from "Utterly Foreign" to "Exactly Me"
1pm, Beaman A&B
What does it mean to see the world through the eyes of the other? Does one become the other? Empathize with the other? Or, is the other always off-limits? Postmodernism invokes a theory of becoming illustrated by cinematic representations of doppelgängers, one’s identical double. Phenomenology proposes a theory of analogical apperception, an empathy, through which one transfers one’s own feelings of being a self. And Descartes, after wondering whether passersby were actually automatons, decides on the weakest of approximations for the other, never allowing certainty. In this spectrum from robots and radical difference to doubles and pure identity, Dr. Melanie Walton (Department of Philosophy, Belmont University) will explore whether the moderate answer is actually the most problematic. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

25
Clancy Smith - Community Unlimited: Otherness, Inquiry, and a Challenge for 21st Century America in the Work of C.S. Peirce
2pm, Beaman A&B
Charles Peirce, the father of American pragmatism, forwarded the most extreme form of “social individualism” ever articulated by an American philosopher. Breaking from traditional theories that maintain that the Self is constituted first and then enters into coordinations with the Other only thereafter, Peirce took the opposite approach: the community first exists, an unlimited community of Otherness, from which the Self becomes manifest as a distinct cell. In this talk, Dr. Clancy Smith (Department of Philosophy, Belmont University) will explain Peirce’s social individualism and highlight the necessary embrace of the Other, not as antagonist, but as compatriot along the “long run” of inquiry towards greater heights of Truth and knowledge. Dr. Smith will conclude his investigation by suggesting that Peirce’s insights on Otherness, the unlimited community, and the nature of inquiry offer a challenge to modern American politics and a corrective for the paralysis in Congress. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

25
Mark Anderson: Phiologoi
3pm, Beaman A&B
Philologoi is Belmont’s weekly philosophy discussion group, open to all. Topics discussed in Philologoi are student chosen and range from the ethical to the metaphysical. For this special meeting of Philologoi, a Belmont student will open the discussion by asking an extended question that relates directly to the Humanities Symposium theme of "Encountering Otherness." All members of the audience are strongly encouraged and warmly invited to actively participate.

25
George Yancy - Encountering Whiteness: The Black Body as the Dangerous Other
6pm, Beaman A&B
In this talk, Dr. George Yancy (Duquesne University) argues that whiteness is what he calls the "transcendental norm," that is, whiteness is that which defines nonwhites as other/different/deviant/raced. As such, the Black Body, especially the Black male body, is constructed as a problem, a problem that the Black body has as a feature of its very being. The Black body is ontologically a problem. In short, the Black body is responded to as the very essence of criminality, deviance, evil. He explores the lived dimensions of Blackness vis-a-vis an encounter with whiteness within the context of an elevator, demonstrating that it is not the Black male body that is the problem, but whiteness as transcendental norm, as a site of ethical solipsism and privilege. He examines the dynamics of the encounter, revealing how white racism works within the space of quotidian social encounters. He concludes with the suggestion that whiteness must be put into a state of crisis, such that it loses its way in a world that supports its status as ontologically, ethically, and epistemologically normative. A Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

25
Helen Shores Lee: Dynamite Hill
10am, Neely Hall
Helen Shores Lee lived on "Dynamite Hill" in Birmingham where 50 unsolved bombings took place during the Jim Crow era.  Her father was a prominent Civil Rights attorney who worked on Brown v. Board of Education and was a confidant of Martin Luther King, Jr.  The family was a target of the Ku Klux Klan, including two bombings of their home.  Judge Lee was appointed Circuit Judge of the Tenth Judicial Court of Alabama and became the first African-American woman to serve in such a position.  Her family's story is recounted in her new book The Gentle Giant of Dynamite Hill.
*Sponsored by University Ministries, the College of Law, and the Office of Administration & General Counsel

26
Amy Shuman - Narrative and Empathy: The Limits of Understanding Each Other Through Stories
10am, Beaman A&B
In this talk, Dr. Amy Shuman (Ohio State University) examines narrative and empathy. One of the ways we learn about each other is through the stories we tell about ourselves and others. What are the limits of understanding through stories? Put another way, how do stories unsettle our sense of shared and different experiences. Through stories of personal experience, we try to make sense out of the familiar and unfamiliar. For example, when diagnosed with an illness we might seek others with stories about similar experiences; or people who move to new homelands tell stories to remember people and places left behind. Stories hold out the promise of understanding and having empathy for others. It is a compelling promise, whether or not it is fulfilled. A Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

26
Cece Big Crow - Walk a Mile in My Moccasins: Native American History and Spirituality
11am, Beaman A&B
CeCe Big Crow, of the Lakota reservation at Pine Ridge, South Dakota, will discuss some of the most pressing issues facing Native Americans today, including traditionalism, high suicide rates, and the referendum to legalize alcohol on the reservations. She will explore these issues in the context of the historical developments by which Native Americans came to reservation life and in the context of Native American spirituality. A Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

26
Judy Skeen - When "The Other" is Wild at Heart: Can Human Predators Learn From Prey Animals?
1pm, Beaman A&B
We are surrounded by opportunities to learn from those who are different from us. Diversity has become a welcome awareness for our institutions and relationships. What might we learn if we included in that view those creatures that are oriented differently toward survival and existence? In this session, Dr. Judy Skeen (School of Religion, Belmont University) will focus specifically on learning which is possible if predators step back and observe before interacting with prey animals. Examples from working with horses will be a key element of this conversation. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

26
Cynthia Cox - "I Didn't Say That-You Said That!": Family Stories as Encounters with "Otherness"
3pm, Beaman A&B
In scholarship analyzing family folklore, much is made of the unifying function that often-repeated family stories serve for their tellers and listeners. At the same time, however, it can be argued that family stories also serve as “encounters with otherness.” In narrating our accounts of experiences we have shared with our family members, we articulate our own perceptions of ourselves, our notions of our roles in our families, and our understandings of the people to whom we are related; in this process, we implicitly express our families’ common values, attitudes and beliefs. But in gauging the reactions of our audiences to those stories and in listening to other family members’ tales of the same or similar events, we encounter sometimes subtle, sometimes blatant differences in our views of ourselves and each other; we can thus see how family members differ from one other as well as how they are alike. This panel of Belmont University faculty and graduate students will explore how family stories forge bonds among family members but also how they illuminate tensions in family members’ relationships and the evolutions our conceptions of our families undergo over time. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

27
Robert Barsky - Encountering "Illegal" Immigrants: Future Citizens or People "Out of Place"?
10am, Beaman A&B
The US is home to an estimated 11 million people who are here illegally, and to an estimated 5 million US citizen children with undocumented parents. These 16 million individuals live, go to school, and work in communities throughout the country; and in a city like Nashville, it’s likely that we all will encounter several such individuals every day, as we engage in our normal routines. What does this mean, both to us, and to the undocumented persons with whom we engage? How do we communicate our differences, our similarities, and our views? In this talk, Dr. Robert Barsky (Vanderbilt University) discusses the “first encounter” with undocumented immigrants from the perspectives of language, translation and interpretation. As the debate rages in the Congress about how to manage, admit, deport and integrate different kinds of immigrants, it’s crucial to understand what is at stake in the linguistic interaction between ourselves and these persons, deemed “others.” More specifically, and in order to contribute to our understanding of the translation process, Barsky explores what translation does from a somewhat uncharacteristic perspective that focuses not only upon the transformation of linguistic material from one national language to another, but also on the resistance to this process, with reference to materials deemed inadmissible, uttered by people who we consider outsiders, such as “illegals.” At the same time, he considers another potentially uncomfortable encounter, with literary works that are considered by our courts to be “obscene.” In making this comparison, between the undocumented and the “obscene,” he suggests that the linguistic material at issue in such interactions is not necessarily just untranslatable, but rather undesirable in translation, and therefore untranslatable, because we treat both as “filth” and “dirt,” that is, as matter that is deemed in its filthiness to be “out of place.” A Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

27
Erika Berroth - Other to Your Self: Connect the Dots!
11am, Beaman A&B
How can an artist communicate in language and images the painful twists and turns to a sense of Self affected by histories of displacements in labor migration, system change, war, or cultural re-invention in a new language? Marica Bodroži? offers intriguing points of access in her documentary film, her poetry and prose, that foreground connectedness and similarity to the Other rather than difference and separation. Bodroži?’s work offers Herzgemälde, images painted from the heart, that promote a new understanding of ourselves in relationship to concepts of “home” – as Self with environmental identity and environmental heritage. Those images invite immersion into a flow where “home” as a felt attachment to places and people is found in the midst of both slow and explosive violations in the wake of economic and political power shifts, and where identity is a constant process of becoming. Images and art installations from Bodroži?’s documentary illustrate eloquently the imaginative labor of envisioning connections of Self and Other over time and place. This Featured Presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium will be given by Dr. Erika Berroth (Southwestern University).

27
Pete Giordano - The Colliding Worlds of Professors and Students: Exploring the Intersections of Otherness, Western Psychology, and Classical Confucianism
12pm, Beaman A&B
*Seinfeld* fans will recall the classic “worlds colliding” episode where Relationship George tries to remain separate from Independent George. This goal is impossible, and yet college professors and students may try to maintain a similar relational stance toward each other in the classroom. Heaven forbid that the worlds of professors and students should collide in a meaningful way. In this session, Dr. Pete Giordano (Department of Psychology, Belmont University) will explore the intersections of a psychological understanding of healthy relational dynamics, principles of effective college teaching, and contributions from Classical Confucianism to both of these domains. The aim will be to arrive at a clearer understanding of the “other” in the college classroom. A presentation of the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

27
Peter Kuryla - Encountering the Southern Other: Imagining the Civil Rights Movement as Travel Narrative
1pm, Beaman A&B
The story of the Civil Rights Movement was in many ways a story about travel and hospitality, home and history. White and black activists imagined the movement of which they were a part by telling stories about how white and black Southerners greeted their presence as incomers, and about how a sense of their place in history and in events larger than themselves conflicted with Southern spaces presumably “trapped” by the past. In doing so, many activists committed themselves to the powerful acts of claiming that characterize monumental history, designating who was a part of history and who lay outside it. A presentation by Dr. Peter Kuryla (Department of History, Belmont University) for the 12th Annual Humanities Symposium.

27
Korey Pollard: Faith & Film
10am, Neely Hall
Korey Pollard helps direct the new ABC series Nashville.  His television credits include HBO's Deadwood, FOX's House, ABC's Grey's Anatomy, and CBS' CSI.  His movie credits include Spy Kids 2, Thirteen Days, Waterworld, GI Jane, and Stand By Me.  He has spoken at universities across the country about living out one's faith in the midst of the entertainment industry.
*Sponsored by University Ministries and the Motion Pictures Program

28
Humanities Symposium Writing Workshop I: Stories of the "Other"-Bearing Witness Through Writing
2pm, Beaman A&B
Have you ever wanted to tell your story of being the “other”? Or do you have a story of witnessing another’s story of being excluded, ignored, or even persecuted? This workshop, conducted by Dr. Robbie Pinter of the Belmont University Department of English, will provide an active space in which to write about your experiences of life outside the perceived or real boundaries of what most people consider to be “normal.” It will provide a rich variety of creative methods for accessing your inner voice and then writing about your experiences. The workshop will also build a framework for generating and responding to participants’ stories while fully respecting each writer’s privacy. All are welcome to participate! You must register for this workshop; please call the Writing Center at 615-460-6241 to reserve a seat.

29
Humanities Symposium Writing Workshop II: Writing Other Voices-How to be Who You Are While Being Someone Else
2pm, Beaman A&B
Join Dr. Gary McDowell (Department of English, Belmont University) for a workshop wherein we’ll generate writing (stories, poems, etc.) from multiple perspectives that are both our own and not. So often we fall into the trap of writing from our own points-of-view, but there are so many other voices to explore. Come explore with us! All are welcome! Bring a pen, some paper, and your courage. Let’s write! You must register for this workshop; please call the Writing Center at 615-460-6241 to reserve a seat.

29
Reading and Celebration of Winning Entries, 2013 Sandra Hutchins Humanities Symposium Writing Competition
4pm, Beaman A&B
Join us for a reading of prose and poetry by the winners of the Humanities Symposium Writing Competition. These awards are named in honor of retired Belmont faculty member Sandra Hutchins, longtime creative writing professor and advisor to the Belmont Literary Journal. A reception for the award winners follows the reading.

30
Humanities Symposium Wrap-Up
10am, Beaman A&B
Join the members of the 2013 Humanities Symposium committee to reflect on and discuss what has transpired during the 12th Annual Symposium, on "Encountering Otherness."



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